Although antithrombin, protein C, and protein S defects are well-recognized inherited risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adults, whether they predispose children to these vascular disorders as well is undefined. In a prospective cohort study, we assessed the incidence of spontaneous and risk period-related VTE in children who were family members of adults who, after an episode of symptomatic VTE, had then been identified as carriers of these abnormalities. A total of 134 children from 87 families were enrolled. Seventy (51.5%) of these children were carriers of an inherited defect, and the remaining 64 were not; the mean observation period was 4 years (range, 1-16 years) and 3.9 years (range, 1-13), respectively. Sixteen risk periods were experienced by carriers, and 9 by noncarriers. Six VTE occurred in the 70 carriers during 287 observation-years, accounting for an annual incidence of 2.09% patient-years (95% confidence interval, 0.8-4.5), compared with none in the 64 noncarriers during 248 observation-years. Of the 14 children with thrombophilia who experienced a risk period for thrombosis, 4 (28.6%) developed a VTE episode. The overall incidence of risk-related VTE was 25% per risk period (95% confidence interval, 6.8-64). In conclusion, the thrombotic risk in otherwise healthy children with severe inherited thrombophilia does not seem to differ from that reported for adults with the same defects. Screening for thrombophilia in children who belong to families with these defects seems justified to identify those who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis during risk periods for thrombosis.

Incidence of VTE in asymptomatic children with deficiencies of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S: a prospective cohort study

Tormene, Daniela
;
Campello, Elena;Simion, Chiara;Turatti, Giacomo;Marobin, Michelangelo;Radu, Claudia Maria;Pontarin, Anna;Prandoni, Paolo;Simioni, Paolo
2020

Abstract

Although antithrombin, protein C, and protein S defects are well-recognized inherited risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adults, whether they predispose children to these vascular disorders as well is undefined. In a prospective cohort study, we assessed the incidence of spontaneous and risk period-related VTE in children who were family members of adults who, after an episode of symptomatic VTE, had then been identified as carriers of these abnormalities. A total of 134 children from 87 families were enrolled. Seventy (51.5%) of these children were carriers of an inherited defect, and the remaining 64 were not; the mean observation period was 4 years (range, 1-16 years) and 3.9 years (range, 1-13), respectively. Sixteen risk periods were experienced by carriers, and 9 by noncarriers. Six VTE occurred in the 70 carriers during 287 observation-years, accounting for an annual incidence of 2.09% patient-years (95% confidence interval, 0.8-4.5), compared with none in the 64 noncarriers during 248 observation-years. Of the 14 children with thrombophilia who experienced a risk period for thrombosis, 4 (28.6%) developed a VTE episode. The overall incidence of risk-related VTE was 25% per risk period (95% confidence interval, 6.8-64). In conclusion, the thrombotic risk in otherwise healthy children with severe inherited thrombophilia does not seem to differ from that reported for adults with the same defects. Screening for thrombophilia in children who belong to families with these defects seems justified to identify those who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis during risk periods for thrombosis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3357585
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