BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes associated with different bowel reconstruction techniques following anterior resection for rectal cancer are still a matter of debate. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess quality of life and bowel function in patients who underwent colonic J-pouch or straight colorectal anastomosis reconstruction after low anterior resection. DESIGN: Bowel function and quality of life were assessed within a multicenter randomized trial. Questionnaires were administered before the surgery (baseline) and at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. SETTINGS: Patients were enrolled by 19 centers. The enrollment started in October 2009 and was stopped in February 2016. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01110798). PATIENTS: Patients who underwent low anterior resection for primary mid-low rectal cancer and who were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either stapled colonic J-pouch or straight colorectal anastomosis were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcomes measured were quality of life and bowel function. RESULTS: Of the 379 patients who were evaluable, 312 (82.3%) completed the baseline, 259 (68.3%) the 6-month, 242 (63.9%) the 12-month, and 199 (52.5%) the 24-month assessment. Bowel functioning and quality of life did not significantly differ between arms for almost all domains. The total bowel function score, the urgency, and the stool fractionation scores significantly worsened after surgery and remained impaired over time in both arms (p < 0.0032), whereas constipation improved after surgery but recovered to baseline levels from 1 year onward (p < 0.0036). All patients showed a significant and continuous improvement in emotional functioning (p < 0.0013) and future perspective (p < 0.0001) from baseline to the end of the study. LIMITATIONS: Limitations of the study include missing data, which increased over time; the possibility that some treatments have slightly changed since the study was conducted; and investigators not blind to treatment allocation. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study do not support the routine use of colonic J-pouch reconstruction in patients with rectal cancer who undergo a low anterior resection. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B328.

Colonic J-pouch or straight colorectal reconstruction after low anterior resection for rectal cancer: Impact on quality of life and bowel function: A multicenter prospective randomized study

Gavaruzzi T.;Giandomenico F.;Pucciarelli S.
;
La Torre G.;Marchegiani F.;Lotto L.;Spolverato G.;Del Bianco P.
2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes associated with different bowel reconstruction techniques following anterior resection for rectal cancer are still a matter of debate. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess quality of life and bowel function in patients who underwent colonic J-pouch or straight colorectal anastomosis reconstruction after low anterior resection. DESIGN: Bowel function and quality of life were assessed within a multicenter randomized trial. Questionnaires were administered before the surgery (baseline) and at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. SETTINGS: Patients were enrolled by 19 centers. The enrollment started in October 2009 and was stopped in February 2016. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01110798). PATIENTS: Patients who underwent low anterior resection for primary mid-low rectal cancer and who were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either stapled colonic J-pouch or straight colorectal anastomosis were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcomes measured were quality of life and bowel function. RESULTS: Of the 379 patients who were evaluable, 312 (82.3%) completed the baseline, 259 (68.3%) the 6-month, 242 (63.9%) the 12-month, and 199 (52.5%) the 24-month assessment. Bowel functioning and quality of life did not significantly differ between arms for almost all domains. The total bowel function score, the urgency, and the stool fractionation scores significantly worsened after surgery and remained impaired over time in both arms (p < 0.0032), whereas constipation improved after surgery but recovered to baseline levels from 1 year onward (p < 0.0036). All patients showed a significant and continuous improvement in emotional functioning (p < 0.0013) and future perspective (p < 0.0001) from baseline to the end of the study. LIMITATIONS: Limitations of the study include missing data, which increased over time; the possibility that some treatments have slightly changed since the study was conducted; and investigators not blind to treatment allocation. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study do not support the routine use of colonic J-pouch reconstruction in patients with rectal cancer who undergo a low anterior resection. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B328.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3358974
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