Researchers have found that men and women pursue sex-appropriate strategies to attract mates. On the basis of intrasexual competition, men should be more likely to enact behaviors to look larger, whereas women should be more likely to enact behaviors to look smaller. The types of exercises that each performs should reflect this expectation. The present study replicates and extends work by L. Mealey (1997) on sex differences in exercise behavior. In the present study, male participants focused their energy on gaining muscle mass and enhancing their upper body definition, whereas female participants focused their energy on losing weight with emphasis on their lower body. Both sexes reported efforts to improve their abdominal region. It appears that men and women adopt sex-appropriate exercise behavior as a method of self-enhancement for intrasexual competition. Copyright © 2007 Heldref Publications.

An evolutionary psychology perspective on sex differences in exercise behaviors and motivations

Jonason P. K.
2007

Abstract

Researchers have found that men and women pursue sex-appropriate strategies to attract mates. On the basis of intrasexual competition, men should be more likely to enact behaviors to look larger, whereas women should be more likely to enact behaviors to look smaller. The types of exercises that each performs should reflect this expectation. The present study replicates and extends work by L. Mealey (1997) on sex differences in exercise behavior. In the present study, male participants focused their energy on gaining muscle mass and enhancing their upper body definition, whereas female participants focused their energy on losing weight with emphasis on their lower body. Both sexes reported efforts to improve their abdominal region. It appears that men and women adopt sex-appropriate exercise behavior as a method of self-enhancement for intrasexual competition. Copyright © 2007 Heldref Publications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3359627
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