The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenator instead of standard cardiopulmonary bypass during lung transplantation is debatable. Moreover, recently, the concept of prolonged postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) support has been introduced in many transplant centers to prevent primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and improve early and long-term results. The objective of this study was to review the results of our extracorporeal life support strategy during and after bilateral sequential lung transplantation (BSLT) for pulmonary artery hypertension. We review retrospectively our experience in BSLT for pulmonary artery hypertension between January 2010 and August 2018. A total of 38 patients were identified. Nine patients were transplanted using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), in eight cases CPB was followed by a prolonged ECMO (pECMO) support, 14 patients were transplanted on central ECMO support, and seven patients were transplanted with central ECMO support followed by a pECMO assistance. The effects of different support strategies were evaluated, in particular in-hospital morbidity, mortality, incidence of PGD, and long-term follow-up. The use of CPB was associated with poor postoperative results and worse long-term survival compared with ECMO-supported patients. Predictive preoperative factors for the need of intraoperative CPB instead of ECMO were identified. The pECMO strategy had a favorable effect to mitigate postoperative morbidity and mortality, not only in intraoperative ECMO-supported patients, but even in CPB-supported cases. In our experience, ECMO may be considered as the first choice circulatory support for lung transplantation. Sometimes, in very complex cases, CBP is still necessary. The pECMO strategy is very effective to reduce incidence of PGD even in CPB-supported patients.

Extracorporeal life support during and after bilateral sequential lung transplantation in patients with pulmonary artery hypertension

Dell'Amore A.;
2020

Abstract

The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenator instead of standard cardiopulmonary bypass during lung transplantation is debatable. Moreover, recently, the concept of prolonged postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) support has been introduced in many transplant centers to prevent primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and improve early and long-term results. The objective of this study was to review the results of our extracorporeal life support strategy during and after bilateral sequential lung transplantation (BSLT) for pulmonary artery hypertension. We review retrospectively our experience in BSLT for pulmonary artery hypertension between January 2010 and August 2018. A total of 38 patients were identified. Nine patients were transplanted using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), in eight cases CPB was followed by a prolonged ECMO (pECMO) support, 14 patients were transplanted on central ECMO support, and seven patients were transplanted with central ECMO support followed by a pECMO assistance. The effects of different support strategies were evaluated, in particular in-hospital morbidity, mortality, incidence of PGD, and long-term follow-up. The use of CPB was associated with poor postoperative results and worse long-term survival compared with ECMO-supported patients. Predictive preoperative factors for the need of intraoperative CPB instead of ECMO were identified. The pECMO strategy had a favorable effect to mitigate postoperative morbidity and mortality, not only in intraoperative ECMO-supported patients, but even in CPB-supported cases. In our experience, ECMO may be considered as the first choice circulatory support for lung transplantation. Sometimes, in very complex cases, CBP is still necessary. The pECMO strategy is very effective to reduce incidence of PGD even in CPB-supported patients.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3360333
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