Objectives: Along with changes in subjective and objective sleep patterns, metacognitive control of intrusive and unwanted thoughts at bedtime has been shown to significantly influence sleep quality. The present study examined individual differences between self-reported poor and good sleepers’ thought control strategies, as well as their subjective and objective sleep quality, considering adults in a broad range of ages. Method: The study involved 147 individuals aged 18-79 years, divided into self-reported poor and good sleepers using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Participants’ thought control strategies were assessed using the Thought Control Questionnaire for Insomnia - Revised (TCQI-r). Subjective sleep parameters were recorded in a sleep diary, and objective sleep parameters were measured over 7 days using actigraphy. Results: Self-reported poor sleepers employed aggressive suppression, reappraisal and worry strategies more than self-reported good sleepers. On logistic regression, the use of reappraisal and worry strategies distinguished between poor and good sleepers, while age did not. Self-reported poor sleepers objectively had a much longer sleep onset latency, a shorter total sleeping time, and a lower sleep efficiency, as well as subjectively longer times awake again after sleep onset, and a lower sleep efficiency than self-reported good sleepers. Conclusion: Together with some subjective and objective sleep parameters, the use of certain thought control strategies (reappraisal and worry, in particular) seems to be one of the crucial aspects accounting for individual differences between self-reported poor and good sleepers.

Strategies for controlling sleep-related intrusive thoughts, and subjective and objective sleep quality: how self-reported poor and good sleepers differ

Sella, Enrico
;
Borella, Erika
2021

Abstract

Objectives: Along with changes in subjective and objective sleep patterns, metacognitive control of intrusive and unwanted thoughts at bedtime has been shown to significantly influence sleep quality. The present study examined individual differences between self-reported poor and good sleepers’ thought control strategies, as well as their subjective and objective sleep quality, considering adults in a broad range of ages. Method: The study involved 147 individuals aged 18-79 years, divided into self-reported poor and good sleepers using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Participants’ thought control strategies were assessed using the Thought Control Questionnaire for Insomnia - Revised (TCQI-r). Subjective sleep parameters were recorded in a sleep diary, and objective sleep parameters were measured over 7 days using actigraphy. Results: Self-reported poor sleepers employed aggressive suppression, reappraisal and worry strategies more than self-reported good sleepers. On logistic regression, the use of reappraisal and worry strategies distinguished between poor and good sleepers, while age did not. Self-reported poor sleepers objectively had a much longer sleep onset latency, a shorter total sleeping time, and a lower sleep efficiency, as well as subjectively longer times awake again after sleep onset, and a lower sleep efficiency than self-reported good sleepers. Conclusion: Together with some subjective and objective sleep parameters, the use of certain thought control strategies (reappraisal and worry, in particular) seems to be one of the crucial aspects accounting for individual differences between self-reported poor and good sleepers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3361214
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