Background: Studies on the association between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are limited, and results are inconsistent. We aimed to examine the associations between PFAS serum levels and the prevalence of MetS among highly exposed young adults (ages 20-39) residents of a large area of the Veneto Region (North-Eastern Italy) primarily stemming from PFAS water contamination before September 2013. A total of 15,876 eligible young adult residents living in the investigated municipalities were enrolled in the study from January 2017 to July 2019. Methods: MetS was defined by using a modified harmonized definition requiring the presence of 3 of the following: obesity (body mass index >= 30), elevated triglyceride (TG), reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c >= 6.1% or self-reported diabetes mellitus or drug treatment for hyperglycemia. Multivariable generalized additive models were performed to identify the associations between four serum PFAS, including perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and risk of MetS controlling for potential confounders. Results: A total of 1282 participants (8.1%) met the criteria of MetS with a higher prevalence among men. PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA were not associated with the risk of MetS, whereas PFOS showed a consistent protective effect against the risk of MetS (OR 0.76, (95% CI: 0.69, 0.85) per ln-PFOS). However, we found statistically significant positive associations between PFAS serum levels and individual components of MetS, mainly elevated blood pressure and elevated TG. Conclusion: Our results did not support a consistent association between PFAS and MetS and conflicting findings were observed for individual components of MetS.

Associations of Perfluoroalkyl Substances with Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Highly Exposed Young Adult Community Residents-A Cross-Sectional Study in Veneto Region, Italy

Zare Jeddi, Maryam;Dalla Zuanna, Teresa;Barbieri, Giulia;Pitter, Gisella;Canova, Cristina
2021

Abstract

Background: Studies on the association between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are limited, and results are inconsistent. We aimed to examine the associations between PFAS serum levels and the prevalence of MetS among highly exposed young adults (ages 20-39) residents of a large area of the Veneto Region (North-Eastern Italy) primarily stemming from PFAS water contamination before September 2013. A total of 15,876 eligible young adult residents living in the investigated municipalities were enrolled in the study from January 2017 to July 2019. Methods: MetS was defined by using a modified harmonized definition requiring the presence of 3 of the following: obesity (body mass index >= 30), elevated triglyceride (TG), reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c >= 6.1% or self-reported diabetes mellitus or drug treatment for hyperglycemia. Multivariable generalized additive models were performed to identify the associations between four serum PFAS, including perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and risk of MetS controlling for potential confounders. Results: A total of 1282 participants (8.1%) met the criteria of MetS with a higher prevalence among men. PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA were not associated with the risk of MetS, whereas PFOS showed a consistent protective effect against the risk of MetS (OR 0.76, (95% CI: 0.69, 0.85) per ln-PFOS). However, we found statistically significant positive associations between PFAS serum levels and individual components of MetS, mainly elevated blood pressure and elevated TG. Conclusion: Our results did not support a consistent association between PFAS and MetS and conflicting findings were observed for individual components of MetS.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3387305
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