IN October 2016, inside a sold-out arena in Zurich, a man named Numa Poujouly steered his wheelchair up to the central podium. As the Swiss national anthem played, organizers of the world's first cyborg Olympics hung a gold medal around Poujouly's neck. The 30-yearold, who became paralyzed after a bicycle accident in his teens, had triumphed in the tournament's most futuristic event: A video-game-like race in which the competitors controlled their speeding avatars with just their minds.

Brain racers: How paralyzed athletes used a brain-computer interface to win gold at the cyborg olympics

Tonin L.;
2017

Abstract

IN October 2016, inside a sold-out arena in Zurich, a man named Numa Poujouly steered his wheelchair up to the central podium. As the Swiss national anthem played, organizers of the world's first cyborg Olympics hung a gold medal around Poujouly's neck. The 30-yearold, who became paralyzed after a bicycle accident in his teens, had triumphed in the tournament's most futuristic event: A video-game-like race in which the competitors controlled their speeding avatars with just their minds.
2017
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3389746
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