Livestock species are major contributors to the increase of antimicrobial (AM) resistance which is a worldwide concern for both human and animal health. The over-use of AM is widely acknowledged, however, unlike pigs, poultry and dairy cattle, knowledge on potential risk factors affecting AM usage (AMU) in beef industry is limited. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the impact of farm, breed, sex and season of arrival of purchased beef cattle on AMU in Italian beef cattle. Data on 1 063 batches were collected from January 2016 to April 2019 from specialised beef fattening farms located in the north of Italy. Information on breed, sex, date of arrival, performance traits and AM agents used on farm was collected, and the treatment incidence 100 (TI100) indexes per batch were calculated using the defined daily dose animal estimated according to Italian summaries of product characteristics. Factors affecting TI100 indexes were investigated using a cross-classified multilevel model. Farms largely differed in terms of AMU. Males had greater AMU than females (P < 0.001), likely due to their higher susceptibility to disease. Statistically significant differences were observed between seasons of arrival with summer and spring having lower TI100 indexes than winter and autumn (P < 0.001). Indeed, winter is commonly linked to an increase in respiratory diseases in beef cattle. Finally, the TI100it indexes tended to be different among breeds with Blonde d'Aquitaine and Limousine having greater AMU compared to the other breeds. Results of this study provided valuable information on potential risk factors of AMU in beef production which may be useful to address its reduction. For instance, the development of tailored management strategies for specific breeds, targeted approaches to improve the health of males as well as greater care towards batches purchased in winter are possible advice to implement on-farm for a more responsible AM stewardship.

Exploring potential risk factors of antimicrobial use in beef cattle

Diana A.;Penasa M.;Santinello M.;De Marchi M.
2021

Abstract

Livestock species are major contributors to the increase of antimicrobial (AM) resistance which is a worldwide concern for both human and animal health. The over-use of AM is widely acknowledged, however, unlike pigs, poultry and dairy cattle, knowledge on potential risk factors affecting AM usage (AMU) in beef industry is limited. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the impact of farm, breed, sex and season of arrival of purchased beef cattle on AMU in Italian beef cattle. Data on 1 063 batches were collected from January 2016 to April 2019 from specialised beef fattening farms located in the north of Italy. Information on breed, sex, date of arrival, performance traits and AM agents used on farm was collected, and the treatment incidence 100 (TI100) indexes per batch were calculated using the defined daily dose animal estimated according to Italian summaries of product characteristics. Factors affecting TI100 indexes were investigated using a cross-classified multilevel model. Farms largely differed in terms of AMU. Males had greater AMU than females (P < 0.001), likely due to their higher susceptibility to disease. Statistically significant differences were observed between seasons of arrival with summer and spring having lower TI100 indexes than winter and autumn (P < 0.001). Indeed, winter is commonly linked to an increase in respiratory diseases in beef cattle. Finally, the TI100it indexes tended to be different among breeds with Blonde d'Aquitaine and Limousine having greater AMU compared to the other breeds. Results of this study provided valuable information on potential risk factors of AMU in beef production which may be useful to address its reduction. For instance, the development of tailored management strategies for specific breeds, targeted approaches to improve the health of males as well as greater care towards batches purchased in winter are possible advice to implement on-farm for a more responsible AM stewardship.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3389826
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