Purpose: Aerobic exercise capacity is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease, partly due to alterations at the muscular and microvascular level. This study evaluated oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics as indicator of muscular oxidative metabolism in a population of Kidney Transplant Recipients (KTRs). Methods: Two groups of KTRs enrolled 3 (n = 21) and 12 months (n = 14) after transplantation and a control group of healthy young adults (n = 16) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing on cycle-ergometer. The protocol consisted in two subsequent constant, moderate-load exercise phases with a final incremental test until exhaustion. Results: The time constant of VO2 kinetics was slower in KTRs at 3 and 12 months after transplantation compared to controls (50.4 ± 13.1 s and 43.8 ± 11.6 s vs 28.9 ± 8.4 s, respectively; P < 0.01). Peak VO2 was lower in KTRs evaluated 3 months after transplantation compared to patients evaluated after 1 year (21.3 ± 4.3 and 26.4 ± 8.0 mL/kg/min; P = 0.04). Blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration was higher in KTRs evaluated at 12 months (12.8 ± 1.7 vs 14.6 ± 1.7 g/dL; P < 0.01). Among KTRs, τ showed a moderate negative correlation with Peak VO2 (ρ = - 0.52) and Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) (r = - 0.57) while no significant correlation with Hb and peak heart rate. Conclusions: KTRs show slower VO2 kinetics compared to healthy controls. Hb and peak VO2 seem to improve during the first year after transplantation. VO2 kinetics were significantly associated with indices of cardiorespiratory fitness, but less with central determinants of aerobic capacity, thus suggesting a potential usefulness of adding this index of muscular oxidative metabolism to functional evaluation in KTRs.

A clinical evaluation of VO2 kinetics in kidney transplant recipients

Patti A;Neunhaeuserer D
;
Ortolan S;Roman F;Gasperetti A;Battista F;Di Bella C;Gobbo S;Bergamin M;Furian L;Ermolao A.
2021

Abstract

Purpose: Aerobic exercise capacity is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease, partly due to alterations at the muscular and microvascular level. This study evaluated oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics as indicator of muscular oxidative metabolism in a population of Kidney Transplant Recipients (KTRs). Methods: Two groups of KTRs enrolled 3 (n = 21) and 12 months (n = 14) after transplantation and a control group of healthy young adults (n = 16) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing on cycle-ergometer. The protocol consisted in two subsequent constant, moderate-load exercise phases with a final incremental test until exhaustion. Results: The time constant of VO2 kinetics was slower in KTRs at 3 and 12 months after transplantation compared to controls (50.4 ± 13.1 s and 43.8 ± 11.6 s vs 28.9 ± 8.4 s, respectively; P < 0.01). Peak VO2 was lower in KTRs evaluated 3 months after transplantation compared to patients evaluated after 1 year (21.3 ± 4.3 and 26.4 ± 8.0 mL/kg/min; P = 0.04). Blood haemoglobin (Hb) concentration was higher in KTRs evaluated at 12 months (12.8 ± 1.7 vs 14.6 ± 1.7 g/dL; P < 0.01). Among KTRs, τ showed a moderate negative correlation with Peak VO2 (ρ = - 0.52) and Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) (r = - 0.57) while no significant correlation with Hb and peak heart rate. Conclusions: KTRs show slower VO2 kinetics compared to healthy controls. Hb and peak VO2 seem to improve during the first year after transplantation. VO2 kinetics were significantly associated with indices of cardiorespiratory fitness, but less with central determinants of aerobic capacity, thus suggesting a potential usefulness of adding this index of muscular oxidative metabolism to functional evaluation in KTRs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3390555
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