Climate change and the global economy impose new challenges in the management of food-producing trees and require studying how to model plant physiological responses, namely growth dynamics and phenology. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is a multi-stemmed forest species domesticated for nut production and now widely spread across different continents. However, information on stem growth and its synchronization with leaf and reproductive phenology is extremely limited. This study aimed at I) defining the sequencing of radial growth phases in hazelnut (onset, maximum growth and cessation) and the specific temperature triggering stem growth; II) combining the stem growth phases with leaf and fruit phenology. Point dendrometers were installed on 20 hazelnut trees across 8 orchards distributed in the Northern and Southern hemisphere during a period of three growing seasons between 2015 and 2018. The radial growth variations and climatic parameters were averaged and recorded every 15 minutes. Leaf and reproductive phenology were collected weekly at each site. Results showed that stem radial growth started from DOY 84 to 134 in relation to site and year but within a relatively narrow range of temperature (from 13 to 16.5°C). However, we observed a temperature-related acclimation in the cultivar Tonda di Giffoni. Maximum growth always occurred well before the summer solstice (on average 35 days) and before the maximum annual air temperatures. Xylogenesis developed rapidly since the time interval between onset and maximum growth rate was about 3 weeks. Importantly, the species showed an evident delay of stem growth onset with respect to leaf emergence (on average 4-6 weeks) rarely observed in tree species. These findings represent the first global analysis of radial growth dynamics in hazelnut, which is an essential step for developing models on orchard functioning and management on different continents.

Radial stem growth dynamics and phenology of a multi-stemmed species (Corylus avellana L.) across orchards in the Northern and Southern hemispheres

Pasqualotto, Gaia
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Bicego, Giovanni
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Carraro, Vinicio
Data Curation
;
Anfodillo, Tommaso
Writing – Review & Editing
2021

Abstract

Climate change and the global economy impose new challenges in the management of food-producing trees and require studying how to model plant physiological responses, namely growth dynamics and phenology. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is a multi-stemmed forest species domesticated for nut production and now widely spread across different continents. However, information on stem growth and its synchronization with leaf and reproductive phenology is extremely limited. This study aimed at I) defining the sequencing of radial growth phases in hazelnut (onset, maximum growth and cessation) and the specific temperature triggering stem growth; II) combining the stem growth phases with leaf and fruit phenology. Point dendrometers were installed on 20 hazelnut trees across 8 orchards distributed in the Northern and Southern hemisphere during a period of three growing seasons between 2015 and 2018. The radial growth variations and climatic parameters were averaged and recorded every 15 minutes. Leaf and reproductive phenology were collected weekly at each site. Results showed that stem radial growth started from DOY 84 to 134 in relation to site and year but within a relatively narrow range of temperature (from 13 to 16.5°C). However, we observed a temperature-related acclimation in the cultivar Tonda di Giffoni. Maximum growth always occurred well before the summer solstice (on average 35 days) and before the maximum annual air temperatures. Xylogenesis developed rapidly since the time interval between onset and maximum growth rate was about 3 weeks. Importantly, the species showed an evident delay of stem growth onset with respect to leaf emergence (on average 4-6 weeks) rarely observed in tree species. These findings represent the first global analysis of radial growth dynamics in hazelnut, which is an essential step for developing models on orchard functioning and management on different continents.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3391409
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