Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), ubiquitous persistent environmental contaminants, has led to substantial global concern due to their potential environmental and human health effects. Several epidemiological studies have assessed the possible association between PFAS exposure and risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS), however, the results are ambiguous. The aim of this study was to assess the current human epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to PFAS and MetS. We performed a systematic search strategy using three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) for relevant studies concerning the associations of PFAS with MetS and its clinical relevance from inception until January 2021. We undertook meta-analyses where there were five or more studies with exposure and outcomes assessments that were reasonably comparable. The pooled odd ratios (ORs) were calculated using random effects models and heterogeneity among studies was assessed by I2 index and Q test. A total of 12 cross-sectional studies (10 studies on the general population and two studies in the occupational settings) investigated the association between PFAS exposure and MetS. We pooled data from seven studies on the general population for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and five studies for perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Predominately, most studies reported no statistically significant association between concentrations of PFAS and MetS. In the meta-analysis, the overall measure of effect was not statistically significant, showing no evidence of an association between concentrations of PFOA, PFOS, PFNA, and PFHxS and the risk of MetS. Based on the results of the meta-analysis, current small body of evidence does not support association between PFAS and MetS. However, due to limited number of studies and substantial heterogeneity, results should be interpreted with caution. Further scrutinizing cohort studies are needed to evaluate the association between various and less well-known PFAS substances and their mixture with MetS and its components in both adults and children in different settings.

To which extent are per-and poly-fluorinated substances associated to metabolic syndrome?

Zare Jeddi, Maryam;Soltanmohammadi, Rozita;Barbieri, Giulia;Pitter, Gisella;Dalla Zuanna, Teresa;Canova, Cristina
2021

Abstract

Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), ubiquitous persistent environmental contaminants, has led to substantial global concern due to their potential environmental and human health effects. Several epidemiological studies have assessed the possible association between PFAS exposure and risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS), however, the results are ambiguous. The aim of this study was to assess the current human epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to PFAS and MetS. We performed a systematic search strategy using three electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) for relevant studies concerning the associations of PFAS with MetS and its clinical relevance from inception until January 2021. We undertook meta-analyses where there were five or more studies with exposure and outcomes assessments that were reasonably comparable. The pooled odd ratios (ORs) were calculated using random effects models and heterogeneity among studies was assessed by I2 index and Q test. A total of 12 cross-sectional studies (10 studies on the general population and two studies in the occupational settings) investigated the association between PFAS exposure and MetS. We pooled data from seven studies on the general population for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and five studies for perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Predominately, most studies reported no statistically significant association between concentrations of PFAS and MetS. In the meta-analysis, the overall measure of effect was not statistically significant, showing no evidence of an association between concentrations of PFOA, PFOS, PFNA, and PFHxS and the risk of MetS. Based on the results of the meta-analysis, current small body of evidence does not support association between PFAS and MetS. However, due to limited number of studies and substantial heterogeneity, results should be interpreted with caution. Further scrutinizing cohort studies are needed to evaluate the association between various and less well-known PFAS substances and their mixture with MetS and its components in both adults and children in different settings.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3392682
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