Hypertension and blunted blood pressure (BP) dipping during nighttime sleep are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Chronic insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) may affect the 24-h BP profile. We systematically reviewed the association of insomnia and RLS with BP values during nighttime sleep and the relative BP dipping pattern. We searched relevant articles in any language with selection criteria including enrolment of subjects with insomnia or RLS and with obstructive sleep apnea comorbidity assessment. Of the 872 studies originally retrieved, seven were selected. Four studies enrolled subjects with insomnia. One study relied on sleep diaries to classify nighttime sleep BP, whereas three relied only on clock time. At meta-analysis, subjects with insomnia displayed an attenuated dipping of systolic BP (-2.00%; 95% confidence interval (CI): -3.61 - -0.39%) and diastolic BP (-1.58%; 95% CI: -2.66 ̶ -0.49%) during nighttime sleep compared to controls. Three studies enrolled subjects with RLS. One study relied on polysomnography to classify nighttime sleep BP, whereas two relied only on clock time. Subjects with RLS showed increases in nighttime sleep systolic BP (5.61 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.13̶-11.09 mm Hg) compared to controls. In conclusion, the limited available data suggest that insomnia and RLS are both associated with altered BP control during nighttime sleep. There is need for more clinical studies to confirm these findings, specifically focusing on measurements of BP during objectively defined sleep, on causal roles of leg movements during sleep and alterations in sleep architecture, and on implications for cardiovascular risk. PROSPERO ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF NUMBER: CRD42020217947.

Effects of insomnia and restless legs syndrome on sleep arterial blood pressure: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Maiolino, Giuseppe;Bisogni, Valeria;Vettor, Roberto;Rossi, Gian Paolo;
2021

Abstract

Hypertension and blunted blood pressure (BP) dipping during nighttime sleep are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Chronic insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) may affect the 24-h BP profile. We systematically reviewed the association of insomnia and RLS with BP values during nighttime sleep and the relative BP dipping pattern. We searched relevant articles in any language with selection criteria including enrolment of subjects with insomnia or RLS and with obstructive sleep apnea comorbidity assessment. Of the 872 studies originally retrieved, seven were selected. Four studies enrolled subjects with insomnia. One study relied on sleep diaries to classify nighttime sleep BP, whereas three relied only on clock time. At meta-analysis, subjects with insomnia displayed an attenuated dipping of systolic BP (-2.00%; 95% confidence interval (CI): -3.61 - -0.39%) and diastolic BP (-1.58%; 95% CI: -2.66 ̶ -0.49%) during nighttime sleep compared to controls. Three studies enrolled subjects with RLS. One study relied on polysomnography to classify nighttime sleep BP, whereas two relied only on clock time. Subjects with RLS showed increases in nighttime sleep systolic BP (5.61 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.13̶-11.09 mm Hg) compared to controls. In conclusion, the limited available data suggest that insomnia and RLS are both associated with altered BP control during nighttime sleep. There is need for more clinical studies to confirm these findings, specifically focusing on measurements of BP during objectively defined sleep, on causal roles of leg movements during sleep and alterations in sleep architecture, and on implications for cardiovascular risk. PROSPERO ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF NUMBER: CRD42020217947.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3393248
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