Numerous recent studies have aimed to improve myoelectric control of prostheses. However, the majority of these studies is characterized by two problems that could be easily fulfilled with recent resources supplied by the scientific literature. First, the majority of these studies use only intact subjects, with the unproved assumption that the results apply equally to amputees. Second, usually only electromyography data are used, despite other sensors (e.g., accelerometers) being easy to include into a real life prosthesis control system. In this paper we analyze the mentioned problems by the classification of 40 hand movements in 5 amputated and 40 intact subjects, using both sEMG and accelerometry data and applying several different state of the art methods. The datasets come from the NinaPro database, which supplies publicly available sEMG data to develop and test machine learning algorithms for prosthetics. The number of subjects can seem small at first sight, but it is not considering the literature of the field (which has to face the difficulty of recruiting trans-radial hand amputated subjects). Our results indicate that the maximum average classification accuracy for amputated subjects is 61.14%, which is just 15.86% less than intact subjects, and they show that intact subjects results can be used as proxy measure for amputated subjects. Finally, our comparison shows that accelerometry as a modality is less affected by amputation than electromyography, suggesting that real life prosthetics performance may easily be improved by inclusion of accelerometers.

Classification of hand movements in amputated subjects by sEMG and accelerometers

Atzori M.;
2014

Abstract

Numerous recent studies have aimed to improve myoelectric control of prostheses. However, the majority of these studies is characterized by two problems that could be easily fulfilled with recent resources supplied by the scientific literature. First, the majority of these studies use only intact subjects, with the unproved assumption that the results apply equally to amputees. Second, usually only electromyography data are used, despite other sensors (e.g., accelerometers) being easy to include into a real life prosthesis control system. In this paper we analyze the mentioned problems by the classification of 40 hand movements in 5 amputated and 40 intact subjects, using both sEMG and accelerometry data and applying several different state of the art methods. The datasets come from the NinaPro database, which supplies publicly available sEMG data to develop and test machine learning algorithms for prosthetics. The number of subjects can seem small at first sight, but it is not considering the literature of the field (which has to face the difficulty of recruiting trans-radial hand amputated subjects). Our results indicate that the maximum average classification accuracy for amputated subjects is 61.14%, which is just 15.86% less than intact subjects, and they show that intact subjects results can be used as proxy measure for amputated subjects. Finally, our comparison shows that accelerometry as a modality is less affected by amputation than electromyography, suggesting that real life prosthetics performance may easily be improved by inclusion of accelerometers.
2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014
978-1-4244-7929-0
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3394637
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