(1) Background: The realization of appropriate aortic replicas for in vitro experiments requires a suitable choice of both the material and geometry. The matching between the grade of details of the geometry and the mechanical response of the materials is an open issue that deserves attention. (2) Methods: To explore this issue, we performed a series of Fluid–Structure Interaction simulations, which compared the dynamics of three aortic models. Specifically, we reproduced a patient-specific geometry with a wall of biological tissue or silicone, and a parametric geometry based on in vivo data made in silicone. The biological tissue and the silicone were modeled with a fiber-oriented anisotropic and isotropic hyperelastic model, respectively. (3) Results: Clearly, both the aorta’s geometry and its constitutive material contribute to the determination of the aortic arch deformation; specifically, the parametric aorta exhibits a strain field similar to the patient-specific model with biological tissue. On the contrary, the local geometry affects the flow velocity distribution quite a lot, although it plays a minor role in the helicity along the arch. (4) Conclusions: The use of a patient-specific prototype in silicone does not a priori ensure a satisfactory reproducibility of the real aorta dynamics. Furthermore, the present simulations suggest that the realization of a simplified replica with the same compliance of the real aorta is able to mimic the overall behavior of the vessel.

Numerical models can assist choice of an aortic phantom for in vitro testing

Comunale G.;di Micco L.;Boso D. P.;Susin F. M.;Peruzzo P.
2021

Abstract

(1) Background: The realization of appropriate aortic replicas for in vitro experiments requires a suitable choice of both the material and geometry. The matching between the grade of details of the geometry and the mechanical response of the materials is an open issue that deserves attention. (2) Methods: To explore this issue, we performed a series of Fluid–Structure Interaction simulations, which compared the dynamics of three aortic models. Specifically, we reproduced a patient-specific geometry with a wall of biological tissue or silicone, and a parametric geometry based on in vivo data made in silicone. The biological tissue and the silicone were modeled with a fiber-oriented anisotropic and isotropic hyperelastic model, respectively. (3) Results: Clearly, both the aorta’s geometry and its constitutive material contribute to the determination of the aortic arch deformation; specifically, the parametric aorta exhibits a strain field similar to the patient-specific model with biological tissue. On the contrary, the local geometry affects the flow velocity distribution quite a lot, although it plays a minor role in the helicity along the arch. (4) Conclusions: The use of a patient-specific prototype in silicone does not a priori ensure a satisfactory reproducibility of the real aorta dynamics. Furthermore, the present simulations suggest that the realization of a simplified replica with the same compliance of the real aorta is able to mimic the overall behavior of the vessel.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3397577
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