Background: Social cognition and temperamental and interpretative styles could play a role in the outcome of bariatric surgery. This study aims to assess preliminary evidence about how obesity surgery patients evaluate social inclusion and exclusion through a ball-tossing game called Cyberball, looking at the influence of early maladaptive schemas. Methods: Thirty-four patients with a history of obesity surgery interventions and 44 controls were recruited for this study. A psychological evaluation was performed before and after the Cyberball task with self-report questionnaires. Results: In the ostracism condition, significant differences were seen across all the patients' fundamental psychological needs with less perceived ostracization (p = 0.001) even if they recognized less interaction via fewer ball tosses than controls. Moreover, the ostracism paradigm resulted in patients experiencing a higher urge to binge (p = 0.010) and a higher urge to restrain (p = 0.012) than controls. Looking at differences due to the Cyberball paradigm applied, clear differences emerged only between controls subgroups at the specific self-report scales applied, corroborating the reduced perception of the exclusion. As evidenced by the schema domains, the study found a connection between the impaired limits-schema domain and the drive to binge. Conclusion: The results show that obesity surgery patients reported different effects of the Cyberball task than controls. Different possible interpretations are discussed, and future directions for studies are exposed, both for the evaluation of social interactions effects and in the assessment of the role of specific cognitive schemas.

The Cyberball task in people after obesity surgery: preliminary evaluation of cognitive effects of social inclusion and exclusion with a laboratory task

Paolo Meneguzzo
;
Elena Tenconi;Enrico Collantoni;Gloria Longobardi;Adele Zappalà;Vincenzo Vindigni;Angela Favaro;Chiara Pavan
2021

Abstract

Background: Social cognition and temperamental and interpretative styles could play a role in the outcome of bariatric surgery. This study aims to assess preliminary evidence about how obesity surgery patients evaluate social inclusion and exclusion through a ball-tossing game called Cyberball, looking at the influence of early maladaptive schemas. Methods: Thirty-four patients with a history of obesity surgery interventions and 44 controls were recruited for this study. A psychological evaluation was performed before and after the Cyberball task with self-report questionnaires. Results: In the ostracism condition, significant differences were seen across all the patients' fundamental psychological needs with less perceived ostracization (p = 0.001) even if they recognized less interaction via fewer ball tosses than controls. Moreover, the ostracism paradigm resulted in patients experiencing a higher urge to binge (p = 0.010) and a higher urge to restrain (p = 0.012) than controls. Looking at differences due to the Cyberball paradigm applied, clear differences emerged only between controls subgroups at the specific self-report scales applied, corroborating the reduced perception of the exclusion. As evidenced by the schema domains, the study found a connection between the impaired limits-schema domain and the drive to binge. Conclusion: The results show that obesity surgery patients reported different effects of the Cyberball task than controls. Different possible interpretations are discussed, and future directions for studies are exposed, both for the evaluation of social interactions effects and in the assessment of the role of specific cognitive schemas.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3400740
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