Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) derived fractal analysis of the left ventricle (LV) has been shown in adults to be a useful quantitative measure of trabeculation with high reproducibility and accuracy for the diagnosis of LV non-compaction (LVNC). The aim of this study was to investigate the utility and feasibility of fractal analysis in children. Methods: Eighty-four subjects underwent CMR: (1) 28 patients with LVNC (as defined by the Petersen criteria with NC/C ratio ≥ 2.3); (2) 28 patients referred by clinicians for assessment of hyper-trabeculation and found not to qualify as LVNC (NC/C ≥ 1.8 and < 2.3); (3) 28 controls. The fractal scores for each group were presented as global and maximal fractal dimension as well as for 3 segments of the LV: basal, mid, and apical. Statistical comparison of the fractal scores between the 3 groups was performed. Results: Global fractal dimension (FD) was higher in the LVNC group than in the hyper-trabeculated group: 1.345 (SEM 0.053) vs 1.252 (SEM 0.034), p < 0.001 and higher in hyper-trabeculated group than in controls: 1.252 (SEM 0.034) vs 1.158 (SEM 0.038), p < 0.001. The highest maximum FD was in the apical portion of the LV in the LVNC group, (1.467; SEM 0.035) whereas it was in the mid ventricle in the hyper-trabeculated (1.327; SEM 0.025) and healthy groups (1.251; SEM 0.042). Fractal analysis showed lower intra- and interobserver variability than the Petersen and Jacquier methods. Conclusions: It is technically feasible to perform fractal analysis in children using CMR and that it is quick, accurate and reproducible. Fractal scoring accurately distinguishes between LVNC, hyper-trabeculation and healthy controls as defined by the Petersen criteria.

Left ventricular noncompaction in pediatric population: could cardiovascular magnetic resonance derived fractal analysis aid diagnosis?

Di Salvo G.;Puricelli F.;
2021

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) derived fractal analysis of the left ventricle (LV) has been shown in adults to be a useful quantitative measure of trabeculation with high reproducibility and accuracy for the diagnosis of LV non-compaction (LVNC). The aim of this study was to investigate the utility and feasibility of fractal analysis in children. Methods: Eighty-four subjects underwent CMR: (1) 28 patients with LVNC (as defined by the Petersen criteria with NC/C ratio ≥ 2.3); (2) 28 patients referred by clinicians for assessment of hyper-trabeculation and found not to qualify as LVNC (NC/C ≥ 1.8 and < 2.3); (3) 28 controls. The fractal scores for each group were presented as global and maximal fractal dimension as well as for 3 segments of the LV: basal, mid, and apical. Statistical comparison of the fractal scores between the 3 groups was performed. Results: Global fractal dimension (FD) was higher in the LVNC group than in the hyper-trabeculated group: 1.345 (SEM 0.053) vs 1.252 (SEM 0.034), p < 0.001 and higher in hyper-trabeculated group than in controls: 1.252 (SEM 0.034) vs 1.158 (SEM 0.038), p < 0.001. The highest maximum FD was in the apical portion of the LV in the LVNC group, (1.467; SEM 0.035) whereas it was in the mid ventricle in the hyper-trabeculated (1.327; SEM 0.025) and healthy groups (1.251; SEM 0.042). Fractal analysis showed lower intra- and interobserver variability than the Petersen and Jacquier methods. Conclusions: It is technically feasible to perform fractal analysis in children using CMR and that it is quick, accurate and reproducible. Fractal scoring accurately distinguishes between LVNC, hyper-trabeculation and healthy controls as defined by the Petersen criteria.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3402635
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