Space analogs, such as bed rest, are used to reproduce microgravity-induced morphological and physiological changes and can be used as clinical models of prolonged inactivity. Nevertheless, nonuniform decreases in muscle mass and function have been frequently reported, and peripheral nerve adaptations have been poorly studied, although some of these mechanisms may be explained. Ten young healthy males (18–33 yr) underwent 10 days of horizontal bed rest. Peripheral neurophysiological assessments were performed bilaterally for the dominant (DL) and nondominant upper and lower limbs (N-DL) on the 1st and 10th day of bed rest, including ultrasound of the median, deep peroneal nerve (DPN), and common fibular nerve (CFN), as well as a complete nerve conduction study (NCS) of the upper and lower limbs. Consistently, reduced F waves, suggesting peripheral nerve dysfunction, of both the peroneal (DL: P = 0.005, N-DL: P = 0.013) and tibial nerves (DL: P = 0.037, N-DL: P = 0.005) were found bilaterally, whereas no changes were observed in nerve ultrasound or other parameters of the NCS of both the upper and lower limbs. In these young healthy males, only the F waves, known to respond to postural changes, were significantly affected by short-term bed rest. These preliminary results suggest that during simulated microgravity, most changes occur at the muscle or central nervous system level. Since the assessment of F waves is common in clinical neurophysiological examinations, caution should be used when testing individuals after prolonged immobility.

Peripheral nerve adaptations to 10 days of horizontal bed rest in healthy young adult males

Franchi M. V.;Monti E.;Sirago G.;Narici M. V.;
2021

Abstract

Space analogs, such as bed rest, are used to reproduce microgravity-induced morphological and physiological changes and can be used as clinical models of prolonged inactivity. Nevertheless, nonuniform decreases in muscle mass and function have been frequently reported, and peripheral nerve adaptations have been poorly studied, although some of these mechanisms may be explained. Ten young healthy males (18–33 yr) underwent 10 days of horizontal bed rest. Peripheral neurophysiological assessments were performed bilaterally for the dominant (DL) and nondominant upper and lower limbs (N-DL) on the 1st and 10th day of bed rest, including ultrasound of the median, deep peroneal nerve (DPN), and common fibular nerve (CFN), as well as a complete nerve conduction study (NCS) of the upper and lower limbs. Consistently, reduced F waves, suggesting peripheral nerve dysfunction, of both the peroneal (DL: P = 0.005, N-DL: P = 0.013) and tibial nerves (DL: P = 0.037, N-DL: P = 0.005) were found bilaterally, whereas no changes were observed in nerve ultrasound or other parameters of the NCS of both the upper and lower limbs. In these young healthy males, only the F waves, known to respond to postural changes, were significantly affected by short-term bed rest. These preliminary results suggest that during simulated microgravity, most changes occur at the muscle or central nervous system level. Since the assessment of F waves is common in clinical neurophysiological examinations, caution should be used when testing individuals after prolonged immobility.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3405380
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact