Background/Aims The role of esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) within Lyon consensus phenotypes, especially patients with inconclusive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) evidence, has not been fully investigated. In this multicenter, observational study we aim to compare HRM parameters in patients with GERD stratified according to the Lyon consensus. Methods Clinical and endoscopic data, HRM and multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) studies performed off proton pump inhibitor therapy in patients with esophageal GERD symptoms were reviewed. Lyon consensus criteria identified pathological GERD, reflux hypersensitivity, functional heartburn, and inconclusive GERD. Patients, with inconclusive GERD were further subdivided into 2 groups based on total reflux numbers (≥ 80 or > 80 reflux episodes) during the MII-pH recording time. Results A total of 264 patients formed the study cohort. Pathological GERD and inconclusive GERD patients were associated with higher numbers of reflux episodes, lower mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) values, and a higher proportion of patients with pathologic MNBI compared to functional heartburn (P < 0.05 for each comparison). On multivariate analysis, pathological GERD and inconclusive GERD patients, both with ≥ 80 or > 80 reflux episodes, were significantly associated with pathologic esophagogastric junction contractile integral values and with presence of hiatus hernia (type 2/3 esophagogastric junction). Patients with inconclusive GERD and > 80 reflux episodes were significantly associated with fragmented peristalsis and ineffective esophageal motility whilst inconclusive GERD with ≥ 80 reflux episodes were significantly associated with fragmented peristalsis. Conclusion Esophageal motor parameters on HRM are similar between pathologic and inconclusive GERD according to the Lyon consensus.

Patients with definite and inconclusive evidence of reflux according to lyon consensus display similar motility and esophagogastric junction characteristics

Savarino E.;Ghisa M.;Cicala M.;
2021

Abstract

Background/Aims The role of esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) within Lyon consensus phenotypes, especially patients with inconclusive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) evidence, has not been fully investigated. In this multicenter, observational study we aim to compare HRM parameters in patients with GERD stratified according to the Lyon consensus. Methods Clinical and endoscopic data, HRM and multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) studies performed off proton pump inhibitor therapy in patients with esophageal GERD symptoms were reviewed. Lyon consensus criteria identified pathological GERD, reflux hypersensitivity, functional heartburn, and inconclusive GERD. Patients, with inconclusive GERD were further subdivided into 2 groups based on total reflux numbers (≥ 80 or > 80 reflux episodes) during the MII-pH recording time. Results A total of 264 patients formed the study cohort. Pathological GERD and inconclusive GERD patients were associated with higher numbers of reflux episodes, lower mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) values, and a higher proportion of patients with pathologic MNBI compared to functional heartburn (P < 0.05 for each comparison). On multivariate analysis, pathological GERD and inconclusive GERD patients, both with ≥ 80 or > 80 reflux episodes, were significantly associated with pathologic esophagogastric junction contractile integral values and with presence of hiatus hernia (type 2/3 esophagogastric junction). Patients with inconclusive GERD and > 80 reflux episodes were significantly associated with fragmented peristalsis and ineffective esophageal motility whilst inconclusive GERD with ≥ 80 reflux episodes were significantly associated with fragmented peristalsis. Conclusion Esophageal motor parameters on HRM are similar between pathologic and inconclusive GERD according to the Lyon consensus.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3406418
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