Background: The potassium channel encoded by the ether-a-gogo-related gene 1A (erg1a) has been detected in the atrophying skeletal muscle of mice experiencing either muscle disuse or cancer cachexia and further evidenced to contribute to muscle deterioration by enhancing ubiquitin proteolysis; however, to our knowledge, ERG1A has not been reported in human skeletal muscle. Methods and results: Here, using immunohistochemistry, we detect ERG1A immunofluorescence in human Rectus abdominis skeletal muscle sarcolemma. Further, using single point brightness data, we report the detection of ERG1A immunofluorescence at low levels in the Rectus abdominis muscle sarcolemma of young adult humans and show that it trends toward greater levels (10.6%) in healthy aged adults. Interestingly, we detect ERG1A immunofluorescence at a statistically greater level (53.6%; p < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle of older cancer patients than in age-matched healthy adults. Importantly, using immunoblot, we reveal that lower mass ERG1A protein is 61.5% (p < 0.05) more abundant in the skeletal muscle of cachectic older adults than in healthy age-matched controls. Additionally, we report that the ERG1A protein is detected in a cultured human rhabdomyosarcoma line that may be a good in vitro model for the study of ERG1A in muscle. Conclusions: The data demonstrate that ERG1A is detected more abundantly in the atrophied skeletal muscle of cancer patients, suggesting it may be related to muscle loss in humans as it has been shown to be in mice experiencing muscle atrophy as a result of malignant tumors.

The ERG1A K + Channel Is More Abundant in Rectus abdominis Muscle from Cancer Patients Than that from Healthy Humans

Zampieri S;Sandri M;Sartori R;Ravara B;Merigliano S;Da Dalt G;
2021

Abstract

Background: The potassium channel encoded by the ether-a-gogo-related gene 1A (erg1a) has been detected in the atrophying skeletal muscle of mice experiencing either muscle disuse or cancer cachexia and further evidenced to contribute to muscle deterioration by enhancing ubiquitin proteolysis; however, to our knowledge, ERG1A has not been reported in human skeletal muscle. Methods and results: Here, using immunohistochemistry, we detect ERG1A immunofluorescence in human Rectus abdominis skeletal muscle sarcolemma. Further, using single point brightness data, we report the detection of ERG1A immunofluorescence at low levels in the Rectus abdominis muscle sarcolemma of young adult humans and show that it trends toward greater levels (10.6%) in healthy aged adults. Interestingly, we detect ERG1A immunofluorescence at a statistically greater level (53.6%; p < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle of older cancer patients than in age-matched healthy adults. Importantly, using immunoblot, we reveal that lower mass ERG1A protein is 61.5% (p < 0.05) more abundant in the skeletal muscle of cachectic older adults than in healthy age-matched controls. Additionally, we report that the ERG1A protein is detected in a cultured human rhabdomyosarcoma line that may be a good in vitro model for the study of ERG1A in muscle. Conclusions: The data demonstrate that ERG1A is detected more abundantly in the atrophied skeletal muscle of cancer patients, suggesting it may be related to muscle loss in humans as it has been shown to be in mice experiencing muscle atrophy as a result of malignant tumors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3412255
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