Competitive Offshore Ocean Sailing is a highly demanding activity in which subjects are exposed to psychophysical stressors for a long time. To better define the physiological adaptations, we investigated the stress response of subjects exposed to 3-days long ocean navigation with disruption of circadian rhythms. 6 male subjects were involved in the study and provided urine and saliva samples before setting sail, during a single day of inshore sailing, during 3-days long ocean navigation, and at the arrival, to measure oxidative stress, cortisol, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and metabolic response. Motion Sickness questionnaires were also administered during the navigation. The crew suffered a mean weight loss of 1.58 kg. After the long navigation, a significant increase in ROS production and decrease in total antioxidant capacity and uric acid levels were observed. Lipid peroxidation, NO metabolites, ketones, creatinine, and neopterin levels were also increased. Furthermore, a significant increase in cortisol levels was measured. Finally, we found a correlation between motion sickness questionnaires with the increase of NOx, and no correlation with cortisol levels. Physical and psychological stress response derived from offshore sailing resulted in increased oxidative stress, nitric oxide metabolites, and cortisol levels, unbalanced redox status, transient renal function impairment, and ketosis. A direct correlation between motion sickness symptoms evaluated through questionnaires and NOx levels was also found.

Oxidative stress and motion sickness in one crew during competitive offshore sailing

Giacon, Tommaso Antonio
;
Bosco, Gerardo
;
Cialoni, Danilo;Paganini, Matteo;
2022

Abstract

Competitive Offshore Ocean Sailing is a highly demanding activity in which subjects are exposed to psychophysical stressors for a long time. To better define the physiological adaptations, we investigated the stress response of subjects exposed to 3-days long ocean navigation with disruption of circadian rhythms. 6 male subjects were involved in the study and provided urine and saliva samples before setting sail, during a single day of inshore sailing, during 3-days long ocean navigation, and at the arrival, to measure oxidative stress, cortisol, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) and metabolic response. Motion Sickness questionnaires were also administered during the navigation. The crew suffered a mean weight loss of 1.58 kg. After the long navigation, a significant increase in ROS production and decrease in total antioxidant capacity and uric acid levels were observed. Lipid peroxidation, NO metabolites, ketones, creatinine, and neopterin levels were also increased. Furthermore, a significant increase in cortisol levels was measured. Finally, we found a correlation between motion sickness questionnaires with the increase of NOx, and no correlation with cortisol levels. Physical and psychological stress response derived from offshore sailing resulted in increased oxidative stress, nitric oxide metabolites, and cortisol levels, unbalanced redox status, transient renal function impairment, and ketosis. A direct correlation between motion sickness symptoms evaluated through questionnaires and NOx levels was also found.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3413315
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