Background: COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress has been investigated in the general population with contrasting results probably due to the perceived risk of developing COVID-19. Our study aims to investigate this condition in individuals with ascertained or probable SARS-CoV-2 exposure. Methods: The Coronavirus Peritraumatic Distress Index (CPDI) was administered to people attending a COVID-19 point of care. The sample was stratified for perceived risk in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases, close contacts, case relatives, undergoing screening subjects, and symptomatic subjects. Results: 1463 subjects participated, and with a mean CPDI Score of 28.2 (SD 16.9). CPDI Scores in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases were significantly higher than case relatives (p = 0.02). Multiple logistic regression revealed that having had work changes (p = 0.001), night sleep changes (p < 0.001), physical activity reduction (p = 0.002), alcohol consumption changes (p = 0.003), and at least one relative lost to COVID-19 (p < 0.001) independently predicted higher CPDI Scores. Male sex (p < 0.001), age ≥ 35 years (p < 0.001), higher educational level (p = 0.002), night sleep >7 hours (p = 0.002), and being physically active (p = 0.018) were identified as protective factors. Limitations: Cross-sectional design and the regional recruitment area limit the generalizability of results. Conclusions Mean CPDI values were above the threshold for medium grade peritraumatic distress, with greater CPDI Scores in subjects who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, compared to family members or caregivers without a clear indication to undergo the swab. Specific demographics, physical and mental health events could help in identifying individuals at greater risk of COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress that may benefit from early treatment.

Evaluation of peritraumatic distress at the point of care: A cross-sectional study

Caiolo S.;Miola A.;Moriglia C.;Sambataro F.
2022

Abstract

Background: COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress has been investigated in the general population with contrasting results probably due to the perceived risk of developing COVID-19. Our study aims to investigate this condition in individuals with ascertained or probable SARS-CoV-2 exposure. Methods: The Coronavirus Peritraumatic Distress Index (CPDI) was administered to people attending a COVID-19 point of care. The sample was stratified for perceived risk in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases, close contacts, case relatives, undergoing screening subjects, and symptomatic subjects. Results: 1463 subjects participated, and with a mean CPDI Score of 28.2 (SD 16.9). CPDI Scores in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases were significantly higher than case relatives (p = 0.02). Multiple logistic regression revealed that having had work changes (p = 0.001), night sleep changes (p < 0.001), physical activity reduction (p = 0.002), alcohol consumption changes (p = 0.003), and at least one relative lost to COVID-19 (p < 0.001) independently predicted higher CPDI Scores. Male sex (p < 0.001), age ≥ 35 years (p < 0.001), higher educational level (p = 0.002), night sleep >7 hours (p = 0.002), and being physically active (p = 0.018) were identified as protective factors. Limitations: Cross-sectional design and the regional recruitment area limit the generalizability of results. Conclusions Mean CPDI values were above the threshold for medium grade peritraumatic distress, with greater CPDI Scores in subjects who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, compared to family members or caregivers without a clear indication to undergo the swab. Specific demographics, physical and mental health events could help in identifying individuals at greater risk of COVID-19 related peritraumatic distress that may benefit from early treatment.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3417807
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact