Childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (CECTS), Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) are some of the most common pediatric epileptic syndromes. Despite the relatively benign (self-limited) course of epilepsy, current evidence suggests that these conditions are associated with an increased risk of neuropsychological and behavioral comorbidities. This study provides a cross-epileptic syndromes' comparison reporting on the cognitive and behavioral profile of a cohort of 32 children with CECTS (n = 14), CAE (n = 10) and PS (n = 8), aged 6 to 15 years old. Frequent, although often subclinical cognitive difficulties involving attention, executive functions and academic abilities were found in children with CECTS and CAE, and to a lesser extent in PS. Internalizing symptoms (particularly anxiety) were more common in the PS group compared to CECTS and CAE based on parental reports. Correlational analysis revealed a significant correlation between phonemic fluency and seizure-free interval at the time of evaluation, suggesting a beneficial effect of epilepsy remission on this executive function measure in all the three groups. These results add to existing literature providing further detail on neuropsychological and behavioral peculiarities of children with CECTS, CAE, and PS. Moreover, the need for neuropsychological assessment as part of the standard childhood epilepsy evaluation is stressed. The results are discussed in the context of the current literature, highlighting areas of consensus and controversies related to the clinical management of these epileptic syndromes as well as directions for future research.

Neuropsychological and behavioral profiles of self-limited epileptic syndromes of childhood: a cross-syndrome comparison

Baggio, M
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Toffoli, L
Data Curation
;
Da Rold, M
Data Curation
;
Duma, GM
Formal Analysis
;
Mento, G
Visualization
;
Morao, V
Data Curation
;
Bonanni, P
Supervision
2022

Abstract

Childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (CECTS), Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) are some of the most common pediatric epileptic syndromes. Despite the relatively benign (self-limited) course of epilepsy, current evidence suggests that these conditions are associated with an increased risk of neuropsychological and behavioral comorbidities. This study provides a cross-epileptic syndromes' comparison reporting on the cognitive and behavioral profile of a cohort of 32 children with CECTS (n = 14), CAE (n = 10) and PS (n = 8), aged 6 to 15 years old. Frequent, although often subclinical cognitive difficulties involving attention, executive functions and academic abilities were found in children with CECTS and CAE, and to a lesser extent in PS. Internalizing symptoms (particularly anxiety) were more common in the PS group compared to CECTS and CAE based on parental reports. Correlational analysis revealed a significant correlation between phonemic fluency and seizure-free interval at the time of evaluation, suggesting a beneficial effect of epilepsy remission on this executive function measure in all the three groups. These results add to existing literature providing further detail on neuropsychological and behavioral peculiarities of children with CECTS, CAE, and PS. Moreover, the need for neuropsychological assessment as part of the standard childhood epilepsy evaluation is stressed. The results are discussed in the context of the current literature, highlighting areas of consensus and controversies related to the clinical management of these epileptic syndromes as well as directions for future research.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3419032
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