Deficits in response inhibition may be at the core of the cognitive syndrome in ADHD. Here, inhibitory control mechanisms were studied in 36 ADHD-combined type and 30 healthy children by exploring the event-related brain activity during the Stop Signal task. The influence of age, gender, and previous treatment history was evaluated. The ADHD group showed reduced N200 wave amplitudes. For successful inhibitions, the N200 reduction was greatest over right inferior frontal scalp, and only the control group showed a success-related enhancement of such right frontal N200. Source analysis identified a source of the N200 group effect in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Finally, a late positive wave to failed inhibitions was selectively reduced only in treatment-naïve ADHD children, suggesting that chronic stimulants may normalize late conscious error recognition. Both effects were independent of gender and age. Copyright © 2007 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

Electrophysiological correlates of response inhibition in children and adolescents with ADHD: Influence of gender, age, and previous treatment history

Liotti M.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Semrud-Clikeman M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
2007

Abstract

Deficits in response inhibition may be at the core of the cognitive syndrome in ADHD. Here, inhibitory control mechanisms were studied in 36 ADHD-combined type and 30 healthy children by exploring the event-related brain activity during the Stop Signal task. The influence of age, gender, and previous treatment history was evaluated. The ADHD group showed reduced N200 wave amplitudes. For successful inhibitions, the N200 reduction was greatest over right inferior frontal scalp, and only the control group showed a success-related enhancement of such right frontal N200. Source analysis identified a source of the N200 group effect in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Finally, a late positive wave to failed inhibitions was selectively reduced only in treatment-naïve ADHD children, suggesting that chronic stimulants may normalize late conscious error recognition. Both effects were independent of gender and age. Copyright © 2007 Society for Psychophysiological Research.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3420596
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