Aims: To identify fecal microbiota profiles associated with metabolic abnormalities belonging to the metabolic syndrome (MS), high count of white blood cells (WBCs) and insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Sixty-eight young patients with obesity were stratified for percentile distribution of MS abnormalities. A MS risk score was defined as low, medium, and high MS risk. High WBCs were defined as a count ≥ 7.0 103/µL; severe obesity as body mass index Z-score ≥ 2 standard deviations; IR as homeostatic assessment model algorithm of IR (HOMA) ≥ 3.7. Stool samples were analyzed by 16S rRNA-based metagenomics. Results: We found reduced bacterial richness of fecal microbiota in patients with IR and high diastolic blood pressure (BP). Distinct microbial markers were associated to high BP (Clostridium and Clostridiaceae), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Lachnospiraceae, Gemellaceae, Turicibacter), and high MS risk (Coriobacteriaceae), WBCs (Bacteroides caccae, Gemellaceae), severe obesity (Lachnospiraceae), and impaired glucose tolerance (Bacteroides ovatus and Enterobacteriaceae). Conversely, taxa such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Parabacterodes, Bacteroides caccae, Oscillospira, Parabacterodes distasonis, Coprococcus, and Haemophilus parainfluenzae were associated to low MS risk score, triglycerides, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR, respectively. Supervised multilevel analysis grouped clearly “variable” patients based on the MS risk. Conclusions: This was a proof-of-concept study opening the way at the identification of fecal microbiota signatures, precisely associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in young patients with obesity. These evidences led us to infer, while some gut bacteria have a detrimental role in exacerbating metabolic risk factors some others are beneficial ameliorating cardiovascular host health.

Fecal microbiota signatures of insulin resistance, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome in youth with obesity: a pilot study

Gardini S.;Quagliariello A.
Data Curation
;
2021

Abstract

Aims: To identify fecal microbiota profiles associated with metabolic abnormalities belonging to the metabolic syndrome (MS), high count of white blood cells (WBCs) and insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Sixty-eight young patients with obesity were stratified for percentile distribution of MS abnormalities. A MS risk score was defined as low, medium, and high MS risk. High WBCs were defined as a count ≥ 7.0 103/µL; severe obesity as body mass index Z-score ≥ 2 standard deviations; IR as homeostatic assessment model algorithm of IR (HOMA) ≥ 3.7. Stool samples were analyzed by 16S rRNA-based metagenomics. Results: We found reduced bacterial richness of fecal microbiota in patients with IR and high diastolic blood pressure (BP). Distinct microbial markers were associated to high BP (Clostridium and Clostridiaceae), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Lachnospiraceae, Gemellaceae, Turicibacter), and high MS risk (Coriobacteriaceae), WBCs (Bacteroides caccae, Gemellaceae), severe obesity (Lachnospiraceae), and impaired glucose tolerance (Bacteroides ovatus and Enterobacteriaceae). Conversely, taxa such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Parabacterodes, Bacteroides caccae, Oscillospira, Parabacterodes distasonis, Coprococcus, and Haemophilus parainfluenzae were associated to low MS risk score, triglycerides, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR, respectively. Supervised multilevel analysis grouped clearly “variable” patients based on the MS risk. Conclusions: This was a proof-of-concept study opening the way at the identification of fecal microbiota signatures, precisely associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in young patients with obesity. These evidences led us to infer, while some gut bacteria have a detrimental role in exacerbating metabolic risk factors some others are beneficial ameliorating cardiovascular host health.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3420750
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