Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most common malignancies in the world and a relevant cause of cancer mortality. BC is one of the most frequent causes for bladder removal through radical cystectomy, the gold-standard treatment for localized muscle-invasive and some cases of high-risk, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In order to restore urinary functionality, an autologous intestinal segment has to be used to create a urinary diversion. However, several complications are associated with bowel-tract removal, affecting patients’ quality of life. The present study project aims to develop a bio-engineered material to simplify this surgical procedure, avoiding related surgical complications and improving patients’ quality of life. The main novelty of such a therapeutic approach is the decellularization of a porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) conduit to replace the autologous intestinal segment currently used as urinary diversion after radical cystectomy, while avoiding an immune rejection. Here, we performed a preliminary evaluation of this acellular product by developing a novel decellularization process based on an environmentally friendly, mild detergent, i.e., Tergitol, to replace the recently declared toxic Triton X-100. Treatment efficacy was evaluated through histology, DNA, hydroxyproline and elastin quantification, mechanical and insufflation tests, two-photon microscopy, FTIR analysis, and cytocompatibility tests. The optimized decellularization protocol is effective in removing cells, including DNA content, from the porcine SIS, while preserving the integrity of the extracellular matrix despite an increase in stiffness. An effective sterilization protocol was found, and cytocompatibility of treated SIS was demonstrated from day 1 to day 7, during which human fibroblasts were able to increase in number and strongly organize along tissue fibres. Taken together, this in vitro study suggests that SIS is a suitable candidate for use in urinary diversions in place of autologous intestinal segments, considering the optimal results of decellularization and cell proliferation. Further efforts should be undertaken in order to improve SIS conduit patency and impermeability to realize a future viable substitute.

Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa (SIS) as a Suitable Scaffold for the Creation of a Tissue-Engineered Urinary Conduit: Decellularization, Biomechanical and Biocompatibility Characterization Using New Approaches

Casarin M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Fortunato T. M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Imran S.;Todesco M.;Sandrin D.;Borile G.;Toniolo I.;Marchesan M.;Gerosa G.;Bagno A.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Romanato F.;Carniel E. L.;Morlacco A.;Dal Moro F.
2022

Abstract

Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most common malignancies in the world and a relevant cause of cancer mortality. BC is one of the most frequent causes for bladder removal through radical cystectomy, the gold-standard treatment for localized muscle-invasive and some cases of high-risk, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In order to restore urinary functionality, an autologous intestinal segment has to be used to create a urinary diversion. However, several complications are associated with bowel-tract removal, affecting patients’ quality of life. The present study project aims to develop a bio-engineered material to simplify this surgical procedure, avoiding related surgical complications and improving patients’ quality of life. The main novelty of such a therapeutic approach is the decellularization of a porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) conduit to replace the autologous intestinal segment currently used as urinary diversion after radical cystectomy, while avoiding an immune rejection. Here, we performed a preliminary evaluation of this acellular product by developing a novel decellularization process based on an environmentally friendly, mild detergent, i.e., Tergitol, to replace the recently declared toxic Triton X-100. Treatment efficacy was evaluated through histology, DNA, hydroxyproline and elastin quantification, mechanical and insufflation tests, two-photon microscopy, FTIR analysis, and cytocompatibility tests. The optimized decellularization protocol is effective in removing cells, including DNA content, from the porcine SIS, while preserving the integrity of the extracellular matrix despite an increase in stiffness. An effective sterilization protocol was found, and cytocompatibility of treated SIS was demonstrated from day 1 to day 7, during which human fibroblasts were able to increase in number and strongly organize along tissue fibres. Taken together, this in vitro study suggests that SIS is a suitable candidate for use in urinary diversions in place of autologous intestinal segments, considering the optimal results of decellularization and cell proliferation. Further efforts should be undertaken in order to improve SIS conduit patency and impermeability to realize a future viable substitute.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3427715
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