Maize (Zea mays L.) landraces have the highest genetic variation and adaptation to the natural and anthropological environment where they have evolved. Surveying both qualitative and quantitative morphological traits of existing landraces may be useful in maintaining their genetic diversity and preserving them from genetic erosion. Our research deals with the morpho-phenological and agronomic characterization of a flint maize landrace, named 'Nostrano di Storo', still grown in an inland hilly environment in the low valley of Chiese River in Trentino, North-Eastern Italy. The majority of plants from twenty field populations proved to belong, with few exceptions (NSt2, NSt9, NSt11), to a single population. It means that the plant material long grown in this area and maintained by local farmers through yearly selection forms a single landrace within which some populations (i.e. NSt1, NSt3, NSt4, NSt7, NSt10, NSt18, NSt19, NSt20) could be considered as most representative and taken as 'core'. This is supported by the fact that the genetic variability was much higher within than between field populations: half of the plant and ear traits investigated did not show any significant difference between populations whereas all traits but two showed highly significant differences within populations. Selection carried out over the years by each farmer according to his own criteria produced little genetic differentiation within the original population. Gene flow among farmer populations, most likely occurred through both pollen dispersion to neighboring cultivated fields and seed exchange among farmers, may help to explain the low genetic differentiation. This information is useful for both planning conservation and recognizing the landrace as a unique germplasm source of specific geographic origin.

Characterization of a flint maize (Zea mays L. convar. mays) Italian landrace: I. Morpho-phenological and agronomic traits

Lucchin M.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Barcaccia G.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Parrini P.
Membro del Collaboration Group
2003

Abstract

Maize (Zea mays L.) landraces have the highest genetic variation and adaptation to the natural and anthropological environment where they have evolved. Surveying both qualitative and quantitative morphological traits of existing landraces may be useful in maintaining their genetic diversity and preserving them from genetic erosion. Our research deals with the morpho-phenological and agronomic characterization of a flint maize landrace, named 'Nostrano di Storo', still grown in an inland hilly environment in the low valley of Chiese River in Trentino, North-Eastern Italy. The majority of plants from twenty field populations proved to belong, with few exceptions (NSt2, NSt9, NSt11), to a single population. It means that the plant material long grown in this area and maintained by local farmers through yearly selection forms a single landrace within which some populations (i.e. NSt1, NSt3, NSt4, NSt7, NSt10, NSt18, NSt19, NSt20) could be considered as most representative and taken as 'core'. This is supported by the fact that the genetic variability was much higher within than between field populations: half of the plant and ear traits investigated did not show any significant difference between populations whereas all traits but two showed highly significant differences within populations. Selection carried out over the years by each farmer according to his own criteria produced little genetic differentiation within the original population. Gene flow among farmer populations, most likely occurred through both pollen dispersion to neighboring cultivated fields and seed exchange among farmers, may help to explain the low genetic differentiation. This information is useful for both planning conservation and recognizing the landrace as a unique germplasm source of specific geographic origin.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3439958
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