Whether impaired arterial elasticity in stage 1 hypertension can be brought back to normal by antihypertensive treatment is unknown. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of long-term well-controlled blood pressure (BP) on carotid artery elasticity and endothelial function in stage 1 hypertensive patients. We studied 40 middle-age hypertensives (mean age 49.7 years) whose BP had been kept at target by pharmacological treatment and/or lifestyle modifications for a mean of 7.5 years. Carotid compliance coefficient (CC) and distensibility coefficient (DC) were measured by B-mode ultrasound system. Measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was performed in each carotid artery segment, bilaterally. Endothelial function was evaluated by post-occlusion flow mediated dilation (FMD). Forty normotensive subjects matched for age and sex served as controls. In the hypertensive subjects, BP levels were well controlled throughout the study period (mean office BP 133.7 ± 9.0/81.27 ± 7.0 mmHg). However, compared to controls, significantly higher office BP levels and waist circumference were present. Compared to normotensives, carotid elasticity (DC 24.5 ± 9.0 vs 37.0 ± 8.5 10−3/kPa, and CC 0.92 ± 0.34 vs 1.28 ± 0.36 mm2/kPa, p < 0.0005 for both) as well as endothelial function (FMD 5.7 ± 2.4% vs 9.2 ± 2.9%, p < 0.0005) were significantly impaired in hypertensives. In a logistic regression, hypertensive patients had increased risk of impaired carotid vascular stiffness (odds ratio, 95% CI: 13.04 (2.27−74.96), p = 0.004). Despite the “pseudo-normalization” of BP levels, hypertensive patients with long-term well-controlled BP according to current standards exhibited increased local arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction suggesting that lower BP targets should be sought.

Carotid elasticity is impaired in stage 1 hypertensive patients with well-controlled blood pressure levels

Rattazzi M.;Faggin E.;Palatini P.;Puato M.
2021

Abstract

Whether impaired arterial elasticity in stage 1 hypertension can be brought back to normal by antihypertensive treatment is unknown. Aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of long-term well-controlled blood pressure (BP) on carotid artery elasticity and endothelial function in stage 1 hypertensive patients. We studied 40 middle-age hypertensives (mean age 49.7 years) whose BP had been kept at target by pharmacological treatment and/or lifestyle modifications for a mean of 7.5 years. Carotid compliance coefficient (CC) and distensibility coefficient (DC) were measured by B-mode ultrasound system. Measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was performed in each carotid artery segment, bilaterally. Endothelial function was evaluated by post-occlusion flow mediated dilation (FMD). Forty normotensive subjects matched for age and sex served as controls. In the hypertensive subjects, BP levels were well controlled throughout the study period (mean office BP 133.7 ± 9.0/81.27 ± 7.0 mmHg). However, compared to controls, significantly higher office BP levels and waist circumference were present. Compared to normotensives, carotid elasticity (DC 24.5 ± 9.0 vs 37.0 ± 8.5 10−3/kPa, and CC 0.92 ± 0.34 vs 1.28 ± 0.36 mm2/kPa, p < 0.0005 for both) as well as endothelial function (FMD 5.7 ± 2.4% vs 9.2 ± 2.9%, p < 0.0005) were significantly impaired in hypertensives. In a logistic regression, hypertensive patients had increased risk of impaired carotid vascular stiffness (odds ratio, 95% CI: 13.04 (2.27−74.96), p = 0.004). Despite the “pseudo-normalization” of BP levels, hypertensive patients with long-term well-controlled BP according to current standards exhibited increased local arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction suggesting that lower BP targets should be sought.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3448061
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