Cellular metabolism dynamically regulates the epigenome via availability of the metabolite substrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. The impact of diet on the metabolism-epigenome axis is poorly understood but could alter gene expression and influence metabolic health. ATP citrate-lyase produces acetyl-CoA in the nucleus and cytosol and regulates histone acetylation levels in many cell types. Consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) results in suppression of ATP citrate-lyase levels in tissues such as adipose and liver, but the impact of diet on acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation in these tissues remains unknown. Here we examined the effects of HFD on levels of acyl-CoAs and histone acetylation in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT), liver, and pancreas. We report that mice consuming a HFD have reduced levels of acetyl-CoA and/or acetyl-CoA:CoA ratio in these tissues. In WAT and the pancreas, HFD also impacted the levels of histone acetylation; in particular, histone H3 lysine 23 acetylation was lower in HFD-fed mice. Genetic deletion of Acly in cultured adipocytes also suppressed acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation levels. In the liver, no significant effects on histone acetylation were observed with a HFD despite lower acetyl-CoA levels. Intriguingly, acetylation of several histone lysines correlated with the acetyl-CoA: (iso)butyryl-CoA ratio in liver. Butyryl-CoA and isobutyryl-CoA interacted with the acetyltransferase P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) in liver lysates and inhibited its activity in vitro. This study thus provides evidence that diet can impact tissue acyl-CoA and histone acetylation levels and that acetyl-CoA abundance correlates with acetylation of specific histone lysines in WAT but not in the liver.

Impact of a High-fat Diet on Tissue Acyl-CoA and Histone Acetylation Levels

Carrer, Alessandro;
2017

Abstract

Cellular metabolism dynamically regulates the epigenome via availability of the metabolite substrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. The impact of diet on the metabolism-epigenome axis is poorly understood but could alter gene expression and influence metabolic health. ATP citrate-lyase produces acetyl-CoA in the nucleus and cytosol and regulates histone acetylation levels in many cell types. Consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) results in suppression of ATP citrate-lyase levels in tissues such as adipose and liver, but the impact of diet on acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation in these tissues remains unknown. Here we examined the effects of HFD on levels of acyl-CoAs and histone acetylation in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT), liver, and pancreas. We report that mice consuming a HFD have reduced levels of acetyl-CoA and/or acetyl-CoA:CoA ratio in these tissues. In WAT and the pancreas, HFD also impacted the levels of histone acetylation; in particular, histone H3 lysine 23 acetylation was lower in HFD-fed mice. Genetic deletion of Acly in cultured adipocytes also suppressed acetyl-CoA and histone acetylation levels. In the liver, no significant effects on histone acetylation were observed with a HFD despite lower acetyl-CoA levels. Intriguingly, acetylation of several histone lysines correlated with the acetyl-CoA: (iso)butyryl-CoA ratio in liver. Butyryl-CoA and isobutyryl-CoA interacted with the acetyltransferase P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) in liver lysates and inhibited its activity in vitro. This study thus provides evidence that diet can impact tissue acyl-CoA and histone acetylation levels and that acetyl-CoA abundance correlates with acetylation of specific histone lysines in WAT but not in the liver.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3455393
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