Inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) are genetic conditions that result in metabolism alterations. Although research-based Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing for IMD has been recently implemented, its application in a clinical diagnostic setting remains challenging. Thus, we aimed at investigating the genetic diagnostic approach in a cohort of adult patients with IMDs referred to our adult metabolic unit. A retrospective analysis was performed collecting demographic, clinical, and genetic data of patients referred to the Adult Metabolic Unit in Padua from November 2017 to March 2022. In total, 108 adult patients (mean age: 33 years +/- 17, 55% women) were enrolled in the study, and 83 (77%) of the patients transitioned from the pediatric metabolic clinics. The most prevalent groups of IMDs were disorders of complex molecule degradation (32 patients) and disorders of amino acid metabolism (31) followed by disorders of carbohydrates (26). Molecular genetic diagnosis was reported by 69 (64%) patients, with the higher rate reported by patients referred from specialty other than pediatric (88% vs. 55%). Almost all the subjects (92%) with disorders of complex molecule degradation had a genetic diagnosis. Patients with disorders of amino acid metabolism and disorders of carbohydrates had almost the same rate of genetic test (39% and 38%, respectively). Among the patients without a genetic diagnosis that we tested, two novel mutations in disease-associated genes were detected. In our single-center cohort, a consistent proportion (36%) of subjects with IMDs reaches the adulthood without a genetic demonstration of the disease. This lack, even if in some cases could be related to disease-specific diagnostic approach or to different disease onset, could be detrimental to patient management and impact to some of the specific needs of adult subjects.

Genetic Diagnosis in a Cohort of Adult Patients with Inherited Metabolic Diseases: A Single-Center Experience

Lenzini, Livia;Avogaro, Angelo;
2022

Abstract

Inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) are genetic conditions that result in metabolism alterations. Although research-based Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) testing for IMD has been recently implemented, its application in a clinical diagnostic setting remains challenging. Thus, we aimed at investigating the genetic diagnostic approach in a cohort of adult patients with IMDs referred to our adult metabolic unit. A retrospective analysis was performed collecting demographic, clinical, and genetic data of patients referred to the Adult Metabolic Unit in Padua from November 2017 to March 2022. In total, 108 adult patients (mean age: 33 years +/- 17, 55% women) were enrolled in the study, and 83 (77%) of the patients transitioned from the pediatric metabolic clinics. The most prevalent groups of IMDs were disorders of complex molecule degradation (32 patients) and disorders of amino acid metabolism (31) followed by disorders of carbohydrates (26). Molecular genetic diagnosis was reported by 69 (64%) patients, with the higher rate reported by patients referred from specialty other than pediatric (88% vs. 55%). Almost all the subjects (92%) with disorders of complex molecule degradation had a genetic diagnosis. Patients with disorders of amino acid metabolism and disorders of carbohydrates had almost the same rate of genetic test (39% and 38%, respectively). Among the patients without a genetic diagnosis that we tested, two novel mutations in disease-associated genes were detected. In our single-center cohort, a consistent proportion (36%) of subjects with IMDs reaches the adulthood without a genetic demonstration of the disease. This lack, even if in some cases could be related to disease-specific diagnostic approach or to different disease onset, could be detrimental to patient management and impact to some of the specific needs of adult subjects.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3457016
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