Social distancing and temperature screening have been widely employed to counteract the COVID-19 pandemic, sparking great interest from academia, industry and public administrations worldwide. While most solutions have dealt with these aspects separately, their combination would greatly benefit the continuous monitoring of public spaces and help trigger effective countermeasures. This work presents milliTRACE-IR, a joint mmWave radar and infrared imaging sensing system performing unobtrusive and privacy preserving human body temperature screening and contact tracing in indoor spaces. milliTRACE-IR combines, via a robust sensor fusion approach, mmWave radars and infrared thermal cameras. It achieves fully automated measurement of distancing and body temperature, by jointly tracking the subjects's faces in the thermal camera image plane and the human motion in the radar reference system. Moreover, milliTRACE-IR performs contact tracing: a person with high body temperature is reliably detected by the thermal camera sensor and subsequently traced across a large indoor area in a non-invasive way by the radars. When entering a new room, a subject is re-identified among several other individuals by computing gait-related features from the radar reflections through a deep neural network and using a weighted extreme learning machine as the final re-identification tool. Experimental results, obtained from a real implementation of milliTRACE-IR, demonstrate decimeter-level accuracy in distance/trajectory estimation, inter-personal distance estimation (effective for subjects getting as close as 0.2 m), and accurate temperature monitoring (max. errors of 0.5 degrees C). Furthermore, milliTRACE-IR provides contact tracing through highly accurate (95%) person re-identification, in less than 20 seconds.

milliTRACE-IR: Contact Tracing and Temperature Screening via mmWave and Infrared Sensing

Canil, M
Investigation
;
Pegoraro, J
Investigation
;
Rossi, M
Investigation
2022

Abstract

Social distancing and temperature screening have been widely employed to counteract the COVID-19 pandemic, sparking great interest from academia, industry and public administrations worldwide. While most solutions have dealt with these aspects separately, their combination would greatly benefit the continuous monitoring of public spaces and help trigger effective countermeasures. This work presents milliTRACE-IR, a joint mmWave radar and infrared imaging sensing system performing unobtrusive and privacy preserving human body temperature screening and contact tracing in indoor spaces. milliTRACE-IR combines, via a robust sensor fusion approach, mmWave radars and infrared thermal cameras. It achieves fully automated measurement of distancing and body temperature, by jointly tracking the subjects's faces in the thermal camera image plane and the human motion in the radar reference system. Moreover, milliTRACE-IR performs contact tracing: a person with high body temperature is reliably detected by the thermal camera sensor and subsequently traced across a large indoor area in a non-invasive way by the radars. When entering a new room, a subject is re-identified among several other individuals by computing gait-related features from the radar reflections through a deep neural network and using a weighted extreme learning machine as the final re-identification tool. Experimental results, obtained from a real implementation of milliTRACE-IR, demonstrate decimeter-level accuracy in distance/trajectory estimation, inter-personal distance estimation (effective for subjects getting as close as 0.2 m), and accurate temperature monitoring (max. errors of 0.5 degrees C). Furthermore, milliTRACE-IR provides contact tracing through highly accurate (95%) person re-identification, in less than 20 seconds.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3457385
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