Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and body fat composition (measured with radiological fat parameters (RFP)) and pathological response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer patients. The secondary aim of the study was to assess the role of BMI and RFP on major surgical complications, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods: All patients who underwent surgical resection following nCRT between 2005 and 2017 for mid-low rectal cancer were retrospectively collected. Visceral fat area (VFA), superficial fat area (SFA), visceral/superficial fat area ratio (V/S), perinephric fat thickness (PNF), and waist circumference (WC) were estimated by baseline CT scan. Predictors of pathologic response and postoperative complications were investigated using logistic regression analysis. The correlations between BMI and radiologic fat parameters and survival were investigated using the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results: Out of 144 patients included, a complete (TRG1) and major (TRG1+2) pathologic response was reported in 32 (22%) and 60 (45.5%) cases, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between BMI and all the RFP was found. At a median follow-up of 60 (35–103) months, no differences in terms of OS and DFS were found considering BMI and radiologic fat parameters. At univariable analysis, neither BMI nor radiologic fat parameters were predictors of complete or major pathologic response; nevertheless, VFA, V/S>1, and BMI were predictors of postoperative major complications. Conclusions: We found no associations between BMI and body fat composition and pathological response to nCRT, although VFA, V/S, and BMI were predictors of major complications. BMI and RFP are not related to worse long-term OS and DFS.

Obesity may not be related to pathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

Quoc Riccardo Bao
;
Giovanni Valotto;Valentina Chiminazzo;Alessandra Anna Prete;Badr El Khouzai;Emilio Quaia;Salvatore Pucciarelli;Emanuele Damiano Luca Urso
2022

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and body fat composition (measured with radiological fat parameters (RFP)) and pathological response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer patients. The secondary aim of the study was to assess the role of BMI and RFP on major surgical complications, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods: All patients who underwent surgical resection following nCRT between 2005 and 2017 for mid-low rectal cancer were retrospectively collected. Visceral fat area (VFA), superficial fat area (SFA), visceral/superficial fat area ratio (V/S), perinephric fat thickness (PNF), and waist circumference (WC) were estimated by baseline CT scan. Predictors of pathologic response and postoperative complications were investigated using logistic regression analysis. The correlations between BMI and radiologic fat parameters and survival were investigated using the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test. Results: Out of 144 patients included, a complete (TRG1) and major (TRG1+2) pathologic response was reported in 32 (22%) and 60 (45.5%) cases, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between BMI and all the RFP was found. At a median follow-up of 60 (35–103) months, no differences in terms of OS and DFS were found considering BMI and radiologic fat parameters. At univariable analysis, neither BMI nor radiologic fat parameters were predictors of complete or major pathologic response; nevertheless, VFA, V/S>1, and BMI were predictors of postoperative major complications. Conclusions: We found no associations between BMI and body fat composition and pathological response to nCRT, although VFA, V/S, and BMI were predictors of major complications. BMI and RFP are not related to worse long-term OS and DFS.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3457723
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