Gliomas are commonly characterized by neurocognitive deficits that strongly impact patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life. Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy, and it can also cause cognitive impairment. An important clinical problem is whether patients who undergo surgery will show post-surgical cognitive impairment above and beyond that present before surgery. The relevant rognostic factors are largely unknown. This study aims to quantify the cognitive impairment in glioma patients 1-week after surgery and to compare different pre-surgical information (i.e., cognitive performance, tumor volume, grading, and lesion topography) towards predicting early post-surgical cognitive outcome. We retrospectively recruited a sample of N = 47 patients affected by high-grade and low-grade glioma undergoing brain surgery for tumor resection. Cognitive performance was assessed before and immediately after (~1 week) surgery with an extensive neurocognitive battery. Multivariate linear regression models highlighted the combination of predictors that best explained post-surgical cognitive impairment. The impact of surgery on cognitive functioning was relatively small (i.e., 85% of test scores across the whole sample indicated no decline), and pre-operative cognitive performance was the main predictor of early post-surgical cognitive outcome above and beyond information from tumor topography and volume. In fact, structural lesion information did not significantly improve the accuracy of prediction made from cognitive data before surgery. Our findings suggest that post-surgery neurocognitive deficits are only partially explained by preoperative brain damage. The present results suggest the possibility to make reliable, individualized, and clinically relevant predictions from relatively easy-to-obtain information

Presurgical predictors of early cognitive outcome after brain tumor resection in glioma patients

Zangrossi, Andrea;Silvestri, Erica;Bisio, Marta;Bertoldo, Alessandra;De Pellegrin, Serena;Vallesi, Antonino;D'Avella, Domenico;Denaro, Luca;Mondini, Sara;Semenza, Carlo;Corbetta, Maurizio
2022

Abstract

Gliomas are commonly characterized by neurocognitive deficits that strongly impact patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life. Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy, and it can also cause cognitive impairment. An important clinical problem is whether patients who undergo surgery will show post-surgical cognitive impairment above and beyond that present before surgery. The relevant rognostic factors are largely unknown. This study aims to quantify the cognitive impairment in glioma patients 1-week after surgery and to compare different pre-surgical information (i.e., cognitive performance, tumor volume, grading, and lesion topography) towards predicting early post-surgical cognitive outcome. We retrospectively recruited a sample of N = 47 patients affected by high-grade and low-grade glioma undergoing brain surgery for tumor resection. Cognitive performance was assessed before and immediately after (~1 week) surgery with an extensive neurocognitive battery. Multivariate linear regression models highlighted the combination of predictors that best explained post-surgical cognitive impairment. The impact of surgery on cognitive functioning was relatively small (i.e., 85% of test scores across the whole sample indicated no decline), and pre-operative cognitive performance was the main predictor of early post-surgical cognitive outcome above and beyond information from tumor topography and volume. In fact, structural lesion information did not significantly improve the accuracy of prediction made from cognitive data before surgery. Our findings suggest that post-surgery neurocognitive deficits are only partially explained by preoperative brain damage. The present results suggest the possibility to make reliable, individualized, and clinically relevant predictions from relatively easy-to-obtain information
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3458101
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