Background Abrupt increase of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant bacteria may complicate the course, management, and costs of neurocritical patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. No data exists regarding risk factors for colonization by gram-negative pathogens in neurocritical patients. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with colonization by multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in neurocritical patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a neurointensive care unit over a period of 3 years. We included adult neurocritical patients admitted for more than 48 h. We analyzed several factors including both anamnestic factors and admission diagnosis. Results Four hundred twenty neurocritical patients were retrospectively enrolled. Seventy-three patients developed colonization by multidrug-resistant and 53 by extensively drug-resistant gram negative pathogens. Logistic regression identified intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) as the strongest predictor for both multidrug-resistant (AUC 0.877; 95% CI 0.841-0.913) and extensively drug-resistant (AUC 0.839 0.787-0.892) gram negative pathogens. In addition, external ventricular drainage and intracerebral pressure monitoring catheter were risk factors for XDR. Survival analysis revealed that MDR bacteria colonization happens earlier (log-rank testp = 0.017). Conclusions Optimization of healthcare strategies is required in order to reduce patients' length of stay to prevent multi- and extensively-drug gram-negative colonizations. Indeed, an early external ventricular drainage and intracerebral pressure monitoring catheter removal is deemed necessary as soon as clinically appropriate.

Extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant gram-negative pathogens in the neurocritical intensive care unit

Munari, Marina;Franzoi, Francesca;Sergi, Massimo;De Cassai, Alessandro;Geraldini, Federico;Boscolo, Annalisa;Navalesi, Paolo
2022

Abstract

Background Abrupt increase of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant bacteria may complicate the course, management, and costs of neurocritical patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. No data exists regarding risk factors for colonization by gram-negative pathogens in neurocritical patients. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with colonization by multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria in neurocritical patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a neurointensive care unit over a period of 3 years. We included adult neurocritical patients admitted for more than 48 h. We analyzed several factors including both anamnestic factors and admission diagnosis. Results Four hundred twenty neurocritical patients were retrospectively enrolled. Seventy-three patients developed colonization by multidrug-resistant and 53 by extensively drug-resistant gram negative pathogens. Logistic regression identified intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) as the strongest predictor for both multidrug-resistant (AUC 0.877; 95% CI 0.841-0.913) and extensively drug-resistant (AUC 0.839 0.787-0.892) gram negative pathogens. In addition, external ventricular drainage and intracerebral pressure monitoring catheter were risk factors for XDR. Survival analysis revealed that MDR bacteria colonization happens earlier (log-rank testp = 0.017). Conclusions Optimization of healthcare strategies is required in order to reduce patients' length of stay to prevent multi- and extensively-drug gram-negative colonizations. Indeed, an early external ventricular drainage and intracerebral pressure monitoring catheter removal is deemed necessary as soon as clinically appropriate.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3459657
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