BackgroundPelvic floor dysfunction and urinary incontinence are two of the most frequent gynecological problems, and pelvic floor muscle training is recommended as a first-line treatment, with new approaches such as hypopressive exercises. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of an 8-week supervised training program of hypopressive exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary incontinence symptomatology. DesignBlinded randomized controlled trial. SettingsWomen with pelvic floor dysfunction and urinary incontinence symptoms, aged 18-60 years. ParticipantsA total of 117 participants were randomly allocated to the hypopressive exercises group (n = 62) or a control group that received no intervention (n = 55) and completed the study. Main Outcome MeasuresClinical and sociodemographic data were collected, as well as pelvic floor muscle strength (using the Modified Oxford Scale); the genital prolapse symptoms, colorectal symptoms, and urinary symptoms (with the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory [PFDI-20]); the impact of pelvic floor disorders (PFD) on women's lives (with the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire [PFIQ-7]); and the severity of urinary incontinence symptoms (using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire [ICIQ]). ResultsThe results showed an improvement in the hypopressive group in the pelvic floor muscle strength F (1117) = 89.514, p < 0.001, a significantly lower score for the PFIQ7 total score, t (112) = 28.895, p < 0.001 and FPDI20 t (112) = 7.037, p < 0.001 as well as an improvement in ICIQ-SF values after 8 weeks of intervention in comparison with the control group. ConclusionsAfter performing an 8-week of hipopressive exercises intervention, a decrease in pelvic floor disorders associated symptoms can be observed. In addition, pelvic floor muscle contractility is improved and a decrease in severity and symptoms associated with urinary incontinence has been reported.

The effects of an 8-week hypopressive exercise training program on urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle activation: A randomized controlled trial

Bergamin, Marco;Gobbo, Stefano;
2023

Abstract

BackgroundPelvic floor dysfunction and urinary incontinence are two of the most frequent gynecological problems, and pelvic floor muscle training is recommended as a first-line treatment, with new approaches such as hypopressive exercises. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of an 8-week supervised training program of hypopressive exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary incontinence symptomatology. DesignBlinded randomized controlled trial. SettingsWomen with pelvic floor dysfunction and urinary incontinence symptoms, aged 18-60 years. ParticipantsA total of 117 participants were randomly allocated to the hypopressive exercises group (n = 62) or a control group that received no intervention (n = 55) and completed the study. Main Outcome MeasuresClinical and sociodemographic data were collected, as well as pelvic floor muscle strength (using the Modified Oxford Scale); the genital prolapse symptoms, colorectal symptoms, and urinary symptoms (with the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory [PFDI-20]); the impact of pelvic floor disorders (PFD) on women's lives (with the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire [PFIQ-7]); and the severity of urinary incontinence symptoms (using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire [ICIQ]). ResultsThe results showed an improvement in the hypopressive group in the pelvic floor muscle strength F (1117) = 89.514, p < 0.001, a significantly lower score for the PFIQ7 total score, t (112) = 28.895, p < 0.001 and FPDI20 t (112) = 7.037, p < 0.001 as well as an improvement in ICIQ-SF values after 8 weeks of intervention in comparison with the control group. ConclusionsAfter performing an 8-week of hipopressive exercises intervention, a decrease in pelvic floor disorders associated symptoms can be observed. In addition, pelvic floor muscle contractility is improved and a decrease in severity and symptoms associated with urinary incontinence has been reported.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3473060
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