Context. A few days before the first perihelion of the Solar Orbiter nominal mission, which occurred on 2022 March 26, the Metis coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter detected a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was moving away from the far side of the Sun (with respect to Solar Orbiter) at high northern latitudes. The eruption was also seen by other spacecraft, in particular, by STEREO-A, which was in quadrature configuration with Solar Orbiter. Aims. We analyse the different views of the CME by a constellation of spacecraft with the purpose to determine the speed and acceleration of the CME, and to identify the source region of the CME. Methods. Considering the positions of various spacecraft on 2022 March 22, this CME happened to be within the field of view of STEREO-A/SECCHI, and it was visible over the limb from SOHO/LASCO. We present the results of the 3D reconstruction of the CME based on the graduated cylindrical shell model and of the identification of the possible origin of the CME using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations by Solar Orbiter/EUI, STEREO-A/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The observations in EUV are compared with the coronal magnetic structure obtained by the potential field source surface method. Results. The 3D reconstruction of the CME derives a central latitude of 29 N, a Stonyhurst longitude of 125, and an average radial speed at the apex of 322 ± 33 km s1 between 4 and 13 RȮ, which is probably not high enough to generate a shock wave. The estimated average acceleration of the CME is 16 ± 11 m s2 in the same range of distances from the Sun. This CME may be associated with the disappearance of a coronal cloud prominence, which is seen in the EUV by STEREO-A/EUVI and SDO/AIA, and is also associated with rapidly evolving emerging magnetic flux.

A high-latitude coronal mass ejection observed by a constellation of coronagraphs: Solar Orbiter/Metis, STEREO-A/COR2, and SOHO/LASCO

Naletto G.;
2023

Abstract

Context. A few days before the first perihelion of the Solar Orbiter nominal mission, which occurred on 2022 March 26, the Metis coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter detected a coronal mass ejection (CME) that was moving away from the far side of the Sun (with respect to Solar Orbiter) at high northern latitudes. The eruption was also seen by other spacecraft, in particular, by STEREO-A, which was in quadrature configuration with Solar Orbiter. Aims. We analyse the different views of the CME by a constellation of spacecraft with the purpose to determine the speed and acceleration of the CME, and to identify the source region of the CME. Methods. Considering the positions of various spacecraft on 2022 March 22, this CME happened to be within the field of view of STEREO-A/SECCHI, and it was visible over the limb from SOHO/LASCO. We present the results of the 3D reconstruction of the CME based on the graduated cylindrical shell model and of the identification of the possible origin of the CME using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations by Solar Orbiter/EUI, STEREO-A/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The observations in EUV are compared with the coronal magnetic structure obtained by the potential field source surface method. Results. The 3D reconstruction of the CME derives a central latitude of 29 N, a Stonyhurst longitude of 125, and an average radial speed at the apex of 322 ± 33 km s1 between 4 and 13 RȮ, which is probably not high enough to generate a shock wave. The estimated average acceleration of the CME is 16 ± 11 m s2 in the same range of distances from the Sun. This CME may be associated with the disappearance of a coronal cloud prominence, which is seen in the EUV by STEREO-A/EUVI and SDO/AIA, and is also associated with rapidly evolving emerging magnetic flux.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3492123
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