Background: SARS- CoV-2 virus has had dramatic consequences worldwide being able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), massive thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and, finally, patients' death. In COVID-19 infection, platelets have a procoagulant phenotype that can cause thrombosis in the pulmonary and systemic vascular network. Aspirin is a well-known anti-platelet drug widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular events and systematic reviews suggest a possible benefit of low-dose aspirin (LDA) use in the prevention and treatment of ARDS in patients with COVID-19 infection. However, several studies are available in the literature which do not support any benefits and no association with the patients' outcome. Therefore, currently available data are inconclusive. Materials and patients: Data from the nationwide cohort multicenter study of the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI) were analyzed. We conducted a propensity score-matched cohort analysis to investigate the impact of chronic assumption of LDA on mortality of adult COVID-19 patients admitted in Internal Medicine Units (IMU). Data from 3044 COVID-19 patients who referred to 41 Italian hospitals between February 3rd to May 8th 2020 were analyzed. A propensity score-matched analysis was conducted using the following variables: age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia diabetes, atrial fibrillation, cerebrovascular disease, COPD, CKD and stratified upon LDA usage, excluding anticoagulant treatment. After matching, 380 patients were included in the final analysis (190 in LDA group and 190 in no-LDA group). Results: 66.2% were male, median age was 77 [70-83]. 34.8% of the population died during the hospitalization. Cardiovascular diseases were not significantly different between the groups. After comparison of LDA and no-LDA subgroups, we didn't record a significant difference in mortality rate (35.7% vs 33.7%) duration of hospital stay and ICU admission. In a logistic regression model, age (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09), FiO2 (OR 1.024; 95% CI 1.03-1.04) and days between symptoms onset and hospitalization (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87-0.99) were the only variables independently associated with death.

Low dose aspirin and clinical outcomes in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia: a propensity score-matched cohort analysis from the National SIMI‑COVID‑19 Registry

Carmine Gabriele Gambino;Salvatore Piano;
2023

Abstract

Background: SARS- CoV-2 virus has had dramatic consequences worldwide being able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), massive thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and, finally, patients' death. In COVID-19 infection, platelets have a procoagulant phenotype that can cause thrombosis in the pulmonary and systemic vascular network. Aspirin is a well-known anti-platelet drug widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular events and systematic reviews suggest a possible benefit of low-dose aspirin (LDA) use in the prevention and treatment of ARDS in patients with COVID-19 infection. However, several studies are available in the literature which do not support any benefits and no association with the patients' outcome. Therefore, currently available data are inconclusive. Materials and patients: Data from the nationwide cohort multicenter study of the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI) were analyzed. We conducted a propensity score-matched cohort analysis to investigate the impact of chronic assumption of LDA on mortality of adult COVID-19 patients admitted in Internal Medicine Units (IMU). Data from 3044 COVID-19 patients who referred to 41 Italian hospitals between February 3rd to May 8th 2020 were analyzed. A propensity score-matched analysis was conducted using the following variables: age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia diabetes, atrial fibrillation, cerebrovascular disease, COPD, CKD and stratified upon LDA usage, excluding anticoagulant treatment. After matching, 380 patients were included in the final analysis (190 in LDA group and 190 in no-LDA group). Results: 66.2% were male, median age was 77 [70-83]. 34.8% of the population died during the hospitalization. Cardiovascular diseases were not significantly different between the groups. After comparison of LDA and no-LDA subgroups, we didn't record a significant difference in mortality rate (35.7% vs 33.7%) duration of hospital stay and ICU admission. In a logistic regression model, age (OR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09), FiO2 (OR 1.024; 95% CI 1.03-1.04) and days between symptoms onset and hospitalization (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87-0.99) were the only variables independently associated with death.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3497095
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