Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an inherited heart muscle disease characterized by loss of ventricular myocardium and fibrofatty replacement, which predisposes to scar-related ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, particularly in the young and athletes. Although in its original description the disease was characterized by an exclusive or at least predominant right ventricle (RV) involvement, it has been demonstrated that the fibrofatty scar can also localize in the left ventricle (LV), with the LV lesion that can equalize or even overcome that of the RV. While the right-dominant form is typically associated with mutations in genes encoding for desmosomal proteins, other (non-desmosomal) mutations have been showed to cause the biventricular and left-dominant variants. This has led to a critical evaluation of the 2010 International Task Force criteria, which exclusively addressed the right phenotypic manifestations of ACM. An International Expert consensus document has been recently developed to provide upgraded criteria ("the Padua Criteria") for the diagnosis of the whole spectrum of ACM phenotypes, particularly left-dominant forms, highlighting the use of cardiac magnetic resonance. This review aims to offer an overview of the current knowledge on the genetic basis, the phenotypic expressions, and the diagnosis of left-sided variants, both biventricular and left-dominant, of ACM.

Arrhythmogenic left ventricular cardiomyopathy: Genotype-phenotype correlations and new diagnostic criteria

Cipriani A.;Bauce B.;Zorzi A.;Corrado D.
2021

Abstract

Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an inherited heart muscle disease characterized by loss of ventricular myocardium and fibrofatty replacement, which predisposes to scar-related ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, particularly in the young and athletes. Although in its original description the disease was characterized by an exclusive or at least predominant right ventricle (RV) involvement, it has been demonstrated that the fibrofatty scar can also localize in the left ventricle (LV), with the LV lesion that can equalize or even overcome that of the RV. While the right-dominant form is typically associated with mutations in genes encoding for desmosomal proteins, other (non-desmosomal) mutations have been showed to cause the biventricular and left-dominant variants. This has led to a critical evaluation of the 2010 International Task Force criteria, which exclusively addressed the right phenotypic manifestations of ACM. An International Expert consensus document has been recently developed to provide upgraded criteria ("the Padua Criteria") for the diagnosis of the whole spectrum of ACM phenotypes, particularly left-dominant forms, highlighting the use of cardiac magnetic resonance. This review aims to offer an overview of the current knowledge on the genetic basis, the phenotypic expressions, and the diagnosis of left-sided variants, both biventricular and left-dominant, of ACM.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3501267
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