IntroductionViral infections are common triggers for asthma exacerbation. Subjects with asthma are more susceptible to viral infections and develop more severe or long-lasting lower respiratory tract symptoms than healthy individuals owing to impaired immune responses. Of the many viruses associated with asthma exacerbation, rhinovirus (RV) is the most frequently identified virus in both adults and children.Areas coveredWe reviewed epidemiological and clinical links and mechanistic studies on virus-associated asthma exacerbations. We included sections on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2), the latest evidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in asthma patients, and past and future searches for therapeutic and prevention targets.Expert opinionEarly treatment or prevention of viral infections might significantly reduce the rate of asthma exacerbation, which is one of the key points of disease management. Although it is hypothetically possible nowadays to interfere with every step of the infectious cycle of respiratory tract viruses, vaccination development has provided some of the most encouraging results. Future research should proceed toward the development of a wider spectrum of vaccines to achieve a better quality of life for patients with asthma and to reduce the economic burden on the healthcare system.

Update on virus-induced asthma exacerbations

Bonato, Matteo;Baraldo, Simonetta;
2023

Abstract

IntroductionViral infections are common triggers for asthma exacerbation. Subjects with asthma are more susceptible to viral infections and develop more severe or long-lasting lower respiratory tract symptoms than healthy individuals owing to impaired immune responses. Of the many viruses associated with asthma exacerbation, rhinovirus (RV) is the most frequently identified virus in both adults and children.Areas coveredWe reviewed epidemiological and clinical links and mechanistic studies on virus-associated asthma exacerbations. We included sections on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2), the latest evidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in asthma patients, and past and future searches for therapeutic and prevention targets.Expert opinionEarly treatment or prevention of viral infections might significantly reduce the rate of asthma exacerbation, which is one of the key points of disease management. Although it is hypothetically possible nowadays to interfere with every step of the infectious cycle of respiratory tract viruses, vaccination development has provided some of the most encouraging results. Future research should proceed toward the development of a wider spectrum of vaccines to achieve a better quality of life for patients with asthma and to reduce the economic burden on the healthcare system.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3504691
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