For impact velocities larger than a threshold velocity of 3 km/s, aluminium Whipple Shields present an enhanced protection capability with respect to monolithic protections with the same areal density. In particular, in the range between 3 and 7 km/s the projectile partially fragments and melts after impacting the bumper; modelling this transition might be complex due to the high number of parameters affecting the collision. In particular, limited data is available in literature with a systematic evaluation of such parameters. In this context, a campaign of 22 experiments was performed to assess the response of aluminium Whipple Shields to normal impacts of aluminium projectiles in the transition range up to 5 km/s. In the tests, the projectile diameter was fixed at 2.9 mm and the bumper thickness and impact velocity were systematically varied respectively at 1, 1.5, and 2 mm and between 2.6 and 5 km/s. Collected data included high-velocity videos of the debris cloud generated by the impacts at both low resolution (for all shots) and high resolution (for 19 out of 22 tests); in addition, for 10 experiments high-resolution images of both the bumper and the wall were acquired after the tests. In this paper, the experimental campaign is described and the main collected results are presented; in particular, the influence of the different impact parameters is discussed. Experimental results are finally compared with numerical simulations conducted with a smoothed particle hydrodynamics method available in IMPETUS Solver.

Investigation of aluminium Whipple Shield response to hypervelocity impacts close to ballistic limit between 2.5 and 5 km/s

Lorenzo Olivieri;Cinzia Giacomuzzo;Stefano Lopresti;Alessandro Francesconi;
2024

Abstract

For impact velocities larger than a threshold velocity of 3 km/s, aluminium Whipple Shields present an enhanced protection capability with respect to monolithic protections with the same areal density. In particular, in the range between 3 and 7 km/s the projectile partially fragments and melts after impacting the bumper; modelling this transition might be complex due to the high number of parameters affecting the collision. In particular, limited data is available in literature with a systematic evaluation of such parameters. In this context, a campaign of 22 experiments was performed to assess the response of aluminium Whipple Shields to normal impacts of aluminium projectiles in the transition range up to 5 km/s. In the tests, the projectile diameter was fixed at 2.9 mm and the bumper thickness and impact velocity were systematically varied respectively at 1, 1.5, and 2 mm and between 2.6 and 5 km/s. Collected data included high-velocity videos of the debris cloud generated by the impacts at both low resolution (for all shots) and high resolution (for 19 out of 22 tests); in addition, for 10 experiments high-resolution images of both the bumper and the wall were acquired after the tests. In this paper, the experimental campaign is described and the main collected results are presented; in particular, the influence of the different impact parameters is discussed. Experimental results are finally compared with numerical simulations conducted with a smoothed particle hydrodynamics method available in IMPETUS Solver.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3509819
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact