Generation of a vascular network is a hallmark of solid tumor growth, and attempts to switch off the tumor angiogenic phenotype are promising. However, this angiogenic potential might also be exploited to obtain incorporation into tumor vessels of genetically modified third-party cells, which could behave as targets of immunologic or pharmacologic attack. With this in mind, we addressed the efficiency and selectivity of third-party cell recruitment into experimental tumors generated in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. The animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with human ovarian carcinoma cell lines and with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal)-transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) or human fibroblasts. Transgenic HUVEC were scattered in tumors, but not in normal mouse tissues; immunohistochemical analysis revealed their selective homing to tumor vascular structures, over 50% of which contained beta-gal(+) cells. Injection of beta-gal-transduced human fibroblasts was also associated with transgenic cell incorporation into tumor masses; however, beta-gal(+) fibroblasts did not home to tumor blood vessels and were only localized within the tumor stroma. These findings show that the recruitment of primary third-party cells into the different compartments of experimentally induced tumors is an efficient and selective phenomenon and indicate possible alternative ways of confronting the tumor angiogenic potential in cancer therapy.

Recruitment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human primary fibroblasts into experimental tumors growing in SCID mice

PARENTI, ANNA ROSITA;INDRACCOLO S;CORTIVO, ROBERTA;ABATANGELO, GIOVANNI;AMADORI, ALBERTO
2003

Abstract

Generation of a vascular network is a hallmark of solid tumor growth, and attempts to switch off the tumor angiogenic phenotype are promising. However, this angiogenic potential might also be exploited to obtain incorporation into tumor vessels of genetically modified third-party cells, which could behave as targets of immunologic or pharmacologic attack. With this in mind, we addressed the efficiency and selectivity of third-party cell recruitment into experimental tumors generated in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. The animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with human ovarian carcinoma cell lines and with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal)-transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) or human fibroblasts. Transgenic HUVEC were scattered in tumors, but not in normal mouse tissues; immunohistochemical analysis revealed their selective homing to tumor vascular structures, over 50% of which contained beta-gal(+) cells. Injection of beta-gal-transduced human fibroblasts was also associated with transgenic cell incorporation into tumor masses; however, beta-gal(+) fibroblasts did not home to tumor blood vessels and were only localized within the tumor stroma. These findings show that the recruitment of primary third-party cells into the different compartments of experimentally induced tumors is an efficient and selective phenomenon and indicate possible alternative ways of confronting the tumor angiogenic potential in cancer therapy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/2433366
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