This study investigated the effects of reading a science text illustrated by either a labeled or an unlabeled picture. Both the online process of reading the text and offline conceptual learning from the text were examined. Eye-tracking methodology was used to trace text and picture processing through indices of first and second-pass reading or inspection. Fifty-six 6th graders were randomly assigned to three reading conditions: Text with a labeled illustration, text with an unlabeled illustration, and text only, in a pretest, immediate, and delayed posttest design. Results showed no differences for factual knowledge as a function of reading condition. However, for the transfer of knowledge at both posttests, readers of the text with the labeled illustration outperformed readers in the other two conditions, who did not differentiate each other. Eye-fixation data showed that the labeled illustration promoted more integrative processing of the learning material, as revealed by the time spent refixating text segments while reinspecting the illustration (look-from illustration to text). In addition, relations emerged between the indices of integration of text and picture during online processing and the offline measures of factual knowledge and transfer of knowledge. Overall, in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of the multimedia principle, the study underlines the crucial role of integrative processing of words and graphics to sustain learning from illustrated text. Moreover, the study indicates that this integrative processing can be effectively supported by appropriate visual signaling.

Effects of picture labeling on illustrated science text processing and learning: Evidence from eye movements

MASON, LUCIA
;
Pluchino, P.;
2013

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of reading a science text illustrated by either a labeled or an unlabeled picture. Both the online process of reading the text and offline conceptual learning from the text were examined. Eye-tracking methodology was used to trace text and picture processing through indices of first and second-pass reading or inspection. Fifty-six 6th graders were randomly assigned to three reading conditions: Text with a labeled illustration, text with an unlabeled illustration, and text only, in a pretest, immediate, and delayed posttest design. Results showed no differences for factual knowledge as a function of reading condition. However, for the transfer of knowledge at both posttests, readers of the text with the labeled illustration outperformed readers in the other two conditions, who did not differentiate each other. Eye-fixation data showed that the labeled illustration promoted more integrative processing of the learning material, as revealed by the time spent refixating text segments while reinspecting the illustration (look-from illustration to text). In addition, relations emerged between the indices of integration of text and picture during online processing and the offline measures of factual knowledge and transfer of knowledge. Overall, in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of the multimedia principle, the study underlines the crucial role of integrative processing of words and graphics to sustain learning from illustrated text. Moreover, the study indicates that this integrative processing can be effectively supported by appropriate visual signaling.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/2665893
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 60
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 50
social impact