Background Mineral iron(III) recognition by bacteria is considered a matter of debate. The peculiar surface chemistry of novel naked magnetic nanoparticles, called SAMNs (surface active maghemite nanoparticles) characterized by solvent exposed Fe3 + sites on their surface, was exploited for studying mineral iron sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens. Methods SAMNs were applied for mimicking Fe3 + ions in solution, acting as magnetically drivable probes to evaluate putative Fe3 + recognition sites on the microorganism surface. Culture broths and nano-bio-conjugates were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Results The whole heritage of a membrane porin (OprF) of P. fluorescens Ps_22 cells was recognized and firmly bound by SAMNs. The binding of nanoparticles to OprF porin was correlated to a drastic inhibition of a siderophore (pyoverdine) biosynthesis and to the stimulation of the production and rate of formation of a secondary siderophore. The analysis of metabolic pathways, based on P. fluorescens Ps_22 genomic information, evidenced that this putative secondary siderophore does not belong to a selection of the most common siderophores. Conclusions In the scenario of an adhesion mechanism, it is plausible to consider OprF as the biological component deputed to the mineral iron sensing in P. fluorescens Ps_22, as well as one key of siderophore regulation. General significance The present work sheds light on mineral iron sensing in microorganisms. Peculiar colloidal naked iron oxide nanoparticles offer a useful approach for probing the adhesion of bacterial surface on mineral iron for the identification of the specific recognition site for this iron uptake regulation in microorganisms.

Enlightening mineral iron sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens by surface active maghemite nanoparticles: Involvement of the OprF porin

MAGRO, MASSIMILIANO;FASOLATO, LUCA;BONAIUTO, EMANUELA;ANDREANI, NADIA ANDREA;BARATELLA, DAVIDE;MIOTTO, GIOVANNI;CARDAZZO, BARBARA;VIANELLO, FABIO
2016

Abstract

Background Mineral iron(III) recognition by bacteria is considered a matter of debate. The peculiar surface chemistry of novel naked magnetic nanoparticles, called SAMNs (surface active maghemite nanoparticles) characterized by solvent exposed Fe3 + sites on their surface, was exploited for studying mineral iron sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens. Methods SAMNs were applied for mimicking Fe3 + ions in solution, acting as magnetically drivable probes to evaluate putative Fe3 + recognition sites on the microorganism surface. Culture broths and nano-bio-conjugates were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Results The whole heritage of a membrane porin (OprF) of P. fluorescens Ps_22 cells was recognized and firmly bound by SAMNs. The binding of nanoparticles to OprF porin was correlated to a drastic inhibition of a siderophore (pyoverdine) biosynthesis and to the stimulation of the production and rate of formation of a secondary siderophore. The analysis of metabolic pathways, based on P. fluorescens Ps_22 genomic information, evidenced that this putative secondary siderophore does not belong to a selection of the most common siderophores. Conclusions In the scenario of an adhesion mechanism, it is plausible to consider OprF as the biological component deputed to the mineral iron sensing in P. fluorescens Ps_22, as well as one key of siderophore regulation. General significance The present work sheds light on mineral iron sensing in microorganisms. Peculiar colloidal naked iron oxide nanoparticles offer a useful approach for probing the adhesion of bacterial surface on mineral iron for the identification of the specific recognition site for this iron uptake regulation in microorganisms.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3187587
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