Genotoxic carcinogenic compounds react chemically with DNA and proteins to form covalent adducts which, in the case of DNA adducts, are strongly believed to be the first step in cancer process (biologically effective dose). The paper reviews the main studies on the dosimetry of adducts in the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. Dosimetry of DNA adducts has been used to assess exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environments such as foundries, coke ovens and the aluminium industry. In many cases, adduct levels higher than those of control populations were found in exposed workers. Only one study reported increased levels of DNA adducts in workers exposed to styrene. Dosimetry of hemoglobin adducts has been used to identify occupational exposure to ethylene oxide, styrene, BaP and arylamines. The results obtained in the last few years confirm the usefulness of dosimetry of DNA and protein adducts in assessing occupational exposure to genotoxic carcinogens occurring in working environments, even at very low exposure levels, but the methods in question require high standardization and validation if systematic errors in measurement are to be avoided. In the coming years, dosimetry of adducts, together with evaluation of individual genetic sensitivity to mutagens and carcinogens, will be one of the new frontiers in research on the prevention of occupational cancer. Current research already makes use of sophisticated analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry, and both specificity and sensitivity in the determination of adducts have been considerably improved. In the future, therefore, dosimetry of adducts may also be applied to industrial health practices.

[Dosimetry of DNA and protein adducts in occupational health]

PAVANELLO, SOFIA;CLONFERO, ERMINIO
1994

Abstract

Genotoxic carcinogenic compounds react chemically with DNA and proteins to form covalent adducts which, in the case of DNA adducts, are strongly believed to be the first step in cancer process (biologically effective dose). The paper reviews the main studies on the dosimetry of adducts in the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. Dosimetry of DNA adducts has been used to assess exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environments such as foundries, coke ovens and the aluminium industry. In many cases, adduct levels higher than those of control populations were found in exposed workers. Only one study reported increased levels of DNA adducts in workers exposed to styrene. Dosimetry of hemoglobin adducts has been used to identify occupational exposure to ethylene oxide, styrene, BaP and arylamines. The results obtained in the last few years confirm the usefulness of dosimetry of DNA and protein adducts in assessing occupational exposure to genotoxic carcinogens occurring in working environments, even at very low exposure levels, but the methods in question require high standardization and validation if systematic errors in measurement are to be avoided. In the coming years, dosimetry of adducts, together with evaluation of individual genetic sensitivity to mutagens and carcinogens, will be one of the new frontiers in research on the prevention of occupational cancer. Current research already makes use of sophisticated analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry, and both specificity and sensitivity in the determination of adducts have been considerably improved. In the future, therefore, dosimetry of adducts may also be applied to industrial health practices.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3230039
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact