Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, affecting striated muscle, due to mutation of SGCA, the gene coding for α-sarcoglycan. Nowadays more than 50 different SGCA missense mutations have been reported. They are supposed to impact folding and trafficking of α-sarcoglycan because the defective polypeptide, although potentially functional, is recognized and disposed of by the quality control of the cell. The secondary reduction of α-sarcoglycan partners, β-, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan, disrupts a key membrane complex that, associated to dystrophin, contributes to assure sarcolemma stability during muscle contraction. The complex deficiency is responsible for muscle wasting and the development of a severe form of dystrophy.Here, we show that the application of small molecules developed to rescue ΔF508-CFTR trafficking, and known as CFTR correctors, also improved the maturation of several α-sarcoglycan mutants that were consequently rescued at the plasma membrane. Remarkably, in myotubes from a patient with LGMD2D, treatment with CFTR correctors induced the proper re-localization of the whole sarcoglycan complex, with a consequent reduction of sarcolemma fragility. Although the mechanism of action of CFTR correctors on defective α-sarcoglycan needs further investigation, this is the first report showing a quantitative and functional recovery of the sarcoglycan-complex in human pathologic samples, upon small molecule treatment. It represents the proof of principle of a pharmacological strategy that acts on the sarcoglycan maturation process and we believe it has a great potential to develop as a cure for most of the patients with LGMD2D.

Repairing folding-defective α-sarcoglycan mutants by CFTR correctors, a potential therapy for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2D

Carotti, Marcello
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
SOARDI, MICHELA
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Bianchini, Elisa;Gomiero, Chiara;Fecchio, Chiara
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Sacchetto, Roberta;Sandonà, Dorianna
2018

Abstract

Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, affecting striated muscle, due to mutation of SGCA, the gene coding for α-sarcoglycan. Nowadays more than 50 different SGCA missense mutations have been reported. They are supposed to impact folding and trafficking of α-sarcoglycan because the defective polypeptide, although potentially functional, is recognized and disposed of by the quality control of the cell. The secondary reduction of α-sarcoglycan partners, β-, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan, disrupts a key membrane complex that, associated to dystrophin, contributes to assure sarcolemma stability during muscle contraction. The complex deficiency is responsible for muscle wasting and the development of a severe form of dystrophy.Here, we show that the application of small molecules developed to rescue ΔF508-CFTR trafficking, and known as CFTR correctors, also improved the maturation of several α-sarcoglycan mutants that were consequently rescued at the plasma membrane. Remarkably, in myotubes from a patient with LGMD2D, treatment with CFTR correctors induced the proper re-localization of the whole sarcoglycan complex, with a consequent reduction of sarcolemma fragility. Although the mechanism of action of CFTR correctors on defective α-sarcoglycan needs further investigation, this is the first report showing a quantitative and functional recovery of the sarcoglycan-complex in human pathologic samples, upon small molecule treatment. It represents the proof of principle of a pharmacological strategy that acts on the sarcoglycan maturation process and we believe it has a great potential to develop as a cure for most of the patients with LGMD2D.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3256612
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