The aim of this study was to assess awake bruxism (AB) behaviours in a sample of healthy young adults using a smartphone-based application for a real-time report (ie, ecological momentary assessment [EMA], also called experience sampling method [ESM]). Forty-six dental students used a smartphone application that sent 15 alerts at random intervals during the day for 1 week to collect AB self-reports. They had to answer on time by tapping on the display icon that refers to their current condition of jaw muscles: relaxed; teeth contact; teeth clenching; teeth grinding; jaw clenching without teeth contact (ie, bracing). The average frequency of relaxed jaw muscles, as a percentage of answers over the 7 days, was 71.7%. Teeth contact (14.5%) and jaw clenching (10.0%) were the most frequent AB behaviours. No significant gender differences were detected. Interindividual differences were quite relevant, but the overall frequency was in general only moderately variable from day-to- day. Coefficient of variation (CV) was low for the condition “relaxed jaw muscles” (0.44). At the individual level, teeth contact was the most prevalent behaviour, with a 39.1%-52.2% proportion of subjects reporting it at least once a day. During a 7-day observation period, the frequency of real-time report of AB behaviours in a sample of healthy young adults was 28.3%. The low daily variability in the average frequency value for the relaxed jaw muscles condition suggests that EMA may be a reliable strategy to get deeper into the epidemiology of oral behaviours. This investigation introduced EMA principles to the study of AB and provided data on the frequency of AB behaviours in young adults that could be compared to populations with risk/associated factors and possible clinical consequences.

Frequency of awake bruxism behaviours in the natural environment. A 7-day, multiple-point observation of real-time report in healthy young adults

BRACCI, ALESSANDRO;L. Favero;L. Salmaso;L. Guarda-Nardini;D. Manfredini
2018

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess awake bruxism (AB) behaviours in a sample of healthy young adults using a smartphone-based application for a real-time report (ie, ecological momentary assessment [EMA], also called experience sampling method [ESM]). Forty-six dental students used a smartphone application that sent 15 alerts at random intervals during the day for 1 week to collect AB self-reports. They had to answer on time by tapping on the display icon that refers to their current condition of jaw muscles: relaxed; teeth contact; teeth clenching; teeth grinding; jaw clenching without teeth contact (ie, bracing). The average frequency of relaxed jaw muscles, as a percentage of answers over the 7 days, was 71.7%. Teeth contact (14.5%) and jaw clenching (10.0%) were the most frequent AB behaviours. No significant gender differences were detected. Interindividual differences were quite relevant, but the overall frequency was in general only moderately variable from day-to- day. Coefficient of variation (CV) was low for the condition “relaxed jaw muscles” (0.44). At the individual level, teeth contact was the most prevalent behaviour, with a 39.1%-52.2% proportion of subjects reporting it at least once a day. During a 7-day observation period, the frequency of real-time report of AB behaviours in a sample of healthy young adults was 28.3%. The low daily variability in the average frequency value for the relaxed jaw muscles condition suggests that EMA may be a reliable strategy to get deeper into the epidemiology of oral behaviours. This investigation introduced EMA principles to the study of AB and provided data on the frequency of AB behaviours in young adults that could be compared to populations with risk/associated factors and possible clinical consequences.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3271005
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