The Carnian Pluvial Episode was a phase of global climatic change and biotic turnover that occurred during the early Late Triassic. In marine sedimentary basins, the arrival of huge amounts of siliciclastic sediments, the establishment of anoxic conditions, and a sudden change of the carbonate factory on platforms marked the Carnian Pluvial Episode. The sedimentary changes are closely associated with abrupt biological turnover among marine and terrestrial groups as, for example, an extinction among ammonoids and conodonts in the ocean, and a turnover of the vertebrate fauna and the flora on land. Multiple negative carbon-isotope excursions were recorded during the Carnian Pluvial Episode in both organic matter and marine carbonates, suggesting repeated injection of 13C-depleted CO2 into the ocean–atmosphere system, but their temporal and causal links with the sedimentological and palaeontological changes are poorly understood. We here review the existing carbon- isotope records and present new data on the carbon-isotope composition of organic carbon in selected sections of the western Tethys realm that record the entire Carnian Pluvial Episode. New ammonoid, conodont and spor- omorph biostratigraphic data were collected and coupled to an extensive review of the existing biostratigraphy to constrain the age of the sampled sections. The results provide biostratigraphically constrained composite organic carbon-isotope curves for the Carnian, which sheds light on the temporal and causal links between the main carbon-isotope perturbations, and the distinct environmental and biotic changes that mark the Carnian Pluvial Episode. The carbon-isotope records suggest that a series of carbon-cycle perturbations, possibly re- cording multiple phases of volcanic activity during the emplacement of the Wrangellia Large Igneous Province, disrupted Carnian environments and ecosystems repeatedly over a remarkably long time interval of about 1 million years.

Multiple negative carbon-isotope excursions during the Carnian Pluvial Episode (Late Triassic)

Dal Corso, Jacopo;Rigo, Manuel;Franceschi, Marco;Roghi, Guido;Mietto, Paolo;Gattolin, Giovanni;Breda, Anna;Preto, Nereo
2018

Abstract

The Carnian Pluvial Episode was a phase of global climatic change and biotic turnover that occurred during the early Late Triassic. In marine sedimentary basins, the arrival of huge amounts of siliciclastic sediments, the establishment of anoxic conditions, and a sudden change of the carbonate factory on platforms marked the Carnian Pluvial Episode. The sedimentary changes are closely associated with abrupt biological turnover among marine and terrestrial groups as, for example, an extinction among ammonoids and conodonts in the ocean, and a turnover of the vertebrate fauna and the flora on land. Multiple negative carbon-isotope excursions were recorded during the Carnian Pluvial Episode in both organic matter and marine carbonates, suggesting repeated injection of 13C-depleted CO2 into the ocean–atmosphere system, but their temporal and causal links with the sedimentological and palaeontological changes are poorly understood. We here review the existing carbon- isotope records and present new data on the carbon-isotope composition of organic carbon in selected sections of the western Tethys realm that record the entire Carnian Pluvial Episode. New ammonoid, conodont and spor- omorph biostratigraphic data were collected and coupled to an extensive review of the existing biostratigraphy to constrain the age of the sampled sections. The results provide biostratigraphically constrained composite organic carbon-isotope curves for the Carnian, which sheds light on the temporal and causal links between the main carbon-isotope perturbations, and the distinct environmental and biotic changes that mark the Carnian Pluvial Episode. The carbon-isotope records suggest that a series of carbon-cycle perturbations, possibly re- cording multiple phases of volcanic activity during the emplacement of the Wrangellia Large Igneous Province, disrupted Carnian environments and ecosystems repeatedly over a remarkably long time interval of about 1 million years.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3278069
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 53
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 47
social impact