Longhorn beetles are commonly moved among continents within wood packaging materials used in trades. Visual inspections carried out at points of entry often fail to detect exotic longhorn beetles as infested materials may have little or no sign of colonization. Black-colored traps baited with pheromones and host volatiles are thus used to improve chances of detection. Here we tested whether existing surveillance protocols for longhorn beetles can be further improved using trap colors different than black. Baited traps of eight different colors (i.e., grey, yellow, green, red, blue, brown, purple and black) were deployed in a randomized complete block design at 16 sites in northern Italy in 2019. A total of 6,001 individuals from 56 longhorn beetle species were trapped. In general, yellow and blue traps caught a significantly higher number of longhorn beetle species than black traps. In addition, trap color significantly affected species richness and abundance at the subfamily and species level, with mixed response mostly linked to the habit of visiting flowers for food. Flower-visiting longhorn beetles mainly exhibited clear preference for flower-related colors, i.e., yellow, green and blue, whereas non-flower-visiting species were more attracted by dark and long-wavelength-dominated colors, like red and brown. Our results clearly indicate that generic surveillance programs should not rely exclusively on black traps and that the use of more trap colors can strongly improve the chance of detecting native and exotic longhorn beetles potentially moved with trades.

Exploiting trap color to improve surveys of longhorn beetles

Cavaletto G.;Faccoli M.;Marini L.;Rassati D.
2021

Abstract

Longhorn beetles are commonly moved among continents within wood packaging materials used in trades. Visual inspections carried out at points of entry often fail to detect exotic longhorn beetles as infested materials may have little or no sign of colonization. Black-colored traps baited with pheromones and host volatiles are thus used to improve chances of detection. Here we tested whether existing surveillance protocols for longhorn beetles can be further improved using trap colors different than black. Baited traps of eight different colors (i.e., grey, yellow, green, red, blue, brown, purple and black) were deployed in a randomized complete block design at 16 sites in northern Italy in 2019. A total of 6,001 individuals from 56 longhorn beetle species were trapped. In general, yellow and blue traps caught a significantly higher number of longhorn beetle species than black traps. In addition, trap color significantly affected species richness and abundance at the subfamily and species level, with mixed response mostly linked to the habit of visiting flowers for food. Flower-visiting longhorn beetles mainly exhibited clear preference for flower-related colors, i.e., yellow, green and blue, whereas non-flower-visiting species were more attracted by dark and long-wavelength-dominated colors, like red and brown. Our results clearly indicate that generic surveillance programs should not rely exclusively on black traps and that the use of more trap colors can strongly improve the chance of detecting native and exotic longhorn beetles potentially moved with trades.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3377260
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