Multivariate prediction of human behavior from resting state data is gaining increasing popularity in the neuroimaging community, with far-reaching translational implications in neurology and psychiatry. However, the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data increases the risk of overfitting, calling for the use of dimensionality reduction methods to build robust predictive models. In this work, we assess the ability of four well-known dimensionality reduction techniques to extract relevant features from resting state functional connectivity matrices of stroke patients, which are then used to build a predictive model of the associated deficits based on cross-validated regularized regression. In particular, we investigated the prediction ability over different neuropsychological scores referring to language, verbal memory, and spatial memory domains. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) were the two best methods at extracting representative features, followed by Dictionary Learning (DL) and Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF). Consistent with these results, features extracted by PCA and ICA were found to be the best predictors of the neuropsychological scores across all the considered cognitive domains. For each feature extraction method, we also examined the impact of the regularization method, model complexity (in terms of number of features that entered in the model) and quality of the maps that display predictive edges in the resting state networks. We conclude that PCA-based models, especially when combined with L1 (LASSO) regularization, provide optimal balance between prediction accuracy, model complexity, and interpretability.

A comparison of feature extraction methods for prediction of neuropsychological scores from functional connectivity data of stroke patients

Testolin A.;De Filippo De Grazia M.;Zorzi M.
2021

Abstract

Multivariate prediction of human behavior from resting state data is gaining increasing popularity in the neuroimaging community, with far-reaching translational implications in neurology and psychiatry. However, the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data increases the risk of overfitting, calling for the use of dimensionality reduction methods to build robust predictive models. In this work, we assess the ability of four well-known dimensionality reduction techniques to extract relevant features from resting state functional connectivity matrices of stroke patients, which are then used to build a predictive model of the associated deficits based on cross-validated regularized regression. In particular, we investigated the prediction ability over different neuropsychological scores referring to language, verbal memory, and spatial memory domains. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) were the two best methods at extracting representative features, followed by Dictionary Learning (DL) and Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF). Consistent with these results, features extracted by PCA and ICA were found to be the best predictors of the neuropsychological scores across all the considered cognitive domains. For each feature extraction method, we also examined the impact of the regularization method, model complexity (in terms of number of features that entered in the model) and quality of the maps that display predictive edges in the resting state networks. We conclude that PCA-based models, especially when combined with L1 (LASSO) regularization, provide optimal balance between prediction accuracy, model complexity, and interpretability.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3390055
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