OBJECTIVES: Acute nystagmus (AN) is an uncommon neurologic sign in children presenting to pediatric emergency departments. We described the epidemiology, clinical features, and underlying causes of AN in a large cohort of children, aiming at identifying features associated with higher risk of severe underlying urgent conditions (UCs). METHODS: Clinical records of all patients aged 0 to 18 years presenting for AN to the pediatric emergency departments of 9 Italian hospitals in an 8-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and demographic features and the underlying causes were analyzed. A logistic regression model was applied to detect predictive variables associated with a higher risk of UCs. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with AN were included (male-to-female ratio: 1.01; mean age: 8 years 11 months). The most frequently associated symptoms were headache (43.2%) and vertigo (42.2%). Ataxia (17.5%) and strabismus (13.1%) were the most common neurologic signs. Migraine (25.7%) and vestibular disorders (14.1%) were the most common causes of AN. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus was the most common cause in infants,1 year of age. UCs accounted for 18.9% of all cases, mostly represented by brain tumors (8.3%). Accordant with the logistic model, cranial nerve deficits, ataxia, or strabismus were strongly associated with an underlying UC. Presence of vertigo or attribution of a nonurgent triage code was associated with a reduced risk of UCs. CONCLUSIONS: AN should be considered an alarming finding in children given the risk of severe UCs. Cranial nerve palsy, ataxia, and strabismus should be considered red flags during the assessment of a child with AN.

Characteristics of acute nystagmus in the pediatric emergency department

Suppiej A.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Parisi P.;Poletto E.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Masi S.;Da Dalt L.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Acute nystagmus (AN) is an uncommon neurologic sign in children presenting to pediatric emergency departments. We described the epidemiology, clinical features, and underlying causes of AN in a large cohort of children, aiming at identifying features associated with higher risk of severe underlying urgent conditions (UCs). METHODS: Clinical records of all patients aged 0 to 18 years presenting for AN to the pediatric emergency departments of 9 Italian hospitals in an 8-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and demographic features and the underlying causes were analyzed. A logistic regression model was applied to detect predictive variables associated with a higher risk of UCs. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with AN were included (male-to-female ratio: 1.01; mean age: 8 years 11 months). The most frequently associated symptoms were headache (43.2%) and vertigo (42.2%). Ataxia (17.5%) and strabismus (13.1%) were the most common neurologic signs. Migraine (25.7%) and vestibular disorders (14.1%) were the most common causes of AN. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus was the most common cause in infants,1 year of age. UCs accounted for 18.9% of all cases, mostly represented by brain tumors (8.3%). Accordant with the logistic model, cranial nerve deficits, ataxia, or strabismus were strongly associated with an underlying UC. Presence of vertigo or attribution of a nonurgent triage code was associated with a reduced risk of UCs. CONCLUSIONS: AN should be considered an alarming finding in children given the risk of severe UCs. Cranial nerve palsy, ataxia, and strabismus should be considered red flags during the assessment of a child with AN.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3394784
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