This study aimed to investigate the genetic and putative causal relationships between fertility traits [i.e., days open (DO) and calving rate (CR)] and milk quality, composition, and fatty acid contents (milk composition traits) in Holstein-Friesian, Brown Swiss, and Simmental cattle, using recursive models within a Bayesian framework. Trivariate animal models were run, each including one fertility trait, one milk composition trait, and, in all models, milk yield. The DO and CR data were merged with the test days closest to the insemination date for milk composition traits. After editing, 16,468 to 23,424 records for Holstein-Friesian, 23,424 to 46,660 for Brown Swiss, and 26,105 to 35,574 for Simmental were available for the analyses. Recursive animal models were applied to investigate the possible causal influences of milk composition traits on fertility and the genetic relationships among these traits. The results suggested a potential cause-and-effect relationship between milk composition traits and fertility traits, with the first trait influencing the latter. We also found greater recursive effects of milk composition traits on DO than on CR, the latter with some putative differences among breeds in terms of sensitivity. For instance, the putative causal effects of somatic cell score on CR (on the observed scale, %) varied from −0.96 to −1.39%, depending on the breed. Concerning fatty acids, we found relevant putative effects of C18:0 on CR, with estimates varying from −7.8 to −9.9%. Protein and casein percentages, and short-chain fatty acid showed larger recursive effects on CR, whereas fat, protein, and casein percentages, C16:0, C18:0, and long-chain fatty acid had larger effects on DO. The results obtained suggested that these milk traits could be considered as effective indicators of the effects of animal metabolic and physiological status on fertility.

Genetic correlations between fertility traits and milk composition and fatty acids in Holstein-Friesian, Brown Swiss, and Simmental cattle using recursive models

Martinez Castillero M.;Pegolo S.
;
Sartori C.;Degano L.;Finocchiaro R.;Bittante G.;Cecchinato A.
2021

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the genetic and putative causal relationships between fertility traits [i.e., days open (DO) and calving rate (CR)] and milk quality, composition, and fatty acid contents (milk composition traits) in Holstein-Friesian, Brown Swiss, and Simmental cattle, using recursive models within a Bayesian framework. Trivariate animal models were run, each including one fertility trait, one milk composition trait, and, in all models, milk yield. The DO and CR data were merged with the test days closest to the insemination date for milk composition traits. After editing, 16,468 to 23,424 records for Holstein-Friesian, 23,424 to 46,660 for Brown Swiss, and 26,105 to 35,574 for Simmental were available for the analyses. Recursive animal models were applied to investigate the possible causal influences of milk composition traits on fertility and the genetic relationships among these traits. The results suggested a potential cause-and-effect relationship between milk composition traits and fertility traits, with the first trait influencing the latter. We also found greater recursive effects of milk composition traits on DO than on CR, the latter with some putative differences among breeds in terms of sensitivity. For instance, the putative causal effects of somatic cell score on CR (on the observed scale, %) varied from −0.96 to −1.39%, depending on the breed. Concerning fatty acids, we found relevant putative effects of C18:0 on CR, with estimates varying from −7.8 to −9.9%. Protein and casein percentages, and short-chain fatty acid showed larger recursive effects on CR, whereas fat, protein, and casein percentages, C16:0, C18:0, and long-chain fatty acid had larger effects on DO. The results obtained suggested that these milk traits could be considered as effective indicators of the effects of animal metabolic and physiological status on fertility.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3398592
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